TIME Magazine Ranks CSI 48th in Country

Top U.S. colleges and universities were ranked in a TIME Magazine article that stemmed from a White House proposal to assess how well colleges and universities serve their students. To see how well the proposal would work, TIME used numbers from the U.S. Department of Education’s Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System.

The College of Staten Island (CSI) ranks 48th out of 2,500 institutions of higher learning in the country when the interactive ratings are set to their default importance of equally weighting graduation rates, tuition, and the percentage of students who receive Pell Grants.  If affordability is of primary importance, CSI tops out as 22nd in the United States in TIME’s interactive rankings.

This is the fifth prestigious national ranking for CSI in the last three years.

Dr. William J. Fritz, recently named president of CSI after serving for the past two years as interim president, and the previous five as provost, feels the ranking algorithms are finally leveling the playing field for institutions such as CSI and The City University of New York (CUNY), where access and affordability dovetail with a world-class education and unparalleled opportunities.

“The continued national recognition for the high-quality education at the College of Staten Island is long overdue, and we are proud to be included in TIME magazine’s list of top colleges and universities in the country,” Fritz said. “Our many national distinctions are made possible by the tireless work and dedicated efforts of our faculty, staff and outstanding students, and are a source of great pride for all members of our college and Island community.”

CSI was named for the first time last year as one of “America’s Best Colleges” in the North by U.S. News & World Report; while Washington Monthly magazine recently named CSI one of “America’s Best-Bang-for-the-Buck Colleges.” Business Insider, the leading business and technology news website, named CSI to its list of top schools in the country with great academics and high acceptance rates that challenge the myth that a college is necessarily better if it is more difficult to gain entrance, criteria which mirror CUNY’s mission. Only one school per state was chosen, with CSI representing New York. The College is also consistently listed in the top 15% of “Military-Friendly” schools in the country by G.I. Jobs magazine.

Each of the 2,500 colleges and universities were evaluated according to its six-year graduation rate, the percentage of full-time, first-time undergraduates receiving Pell grants, and the net cost for students receiving any form of aid whose families make less than $110,000 a year.

The TIME magazine article and interactive rankings regarding graduation rate, accessibility and affordability can be found online at “Obama Thinks He Can Rate Colleges. Can You Do Better?

CSI Represents NY in Nationwide State Rankings

Business Insider, a global leader in aggregating, reporting, and analyzing the top news stories across the Web, teamed with the academic ranking and review service Niche, to compile a list of the country’s “most underrated colleges.”

“Oftentimes, these schools’ strong academic programs are overshadowed by the popular perception that a college is better if it’s tough to get into,” Business Insider reports, adding “these colleges challenge that myth, and are smart — and potentially safe — options for student applicants.”

The College of Staten Island (CSI), a senior college of The City University of New York (CUNY), was the only college chosen in New York State, one of 50 nationwide, to be included in the rankings.  It is the third national ranking for CSI in as many years.

Other prominent schools named to the list includes: University of North Carolina, University of Pittsburgh, University of Maryland, West Virginia University, American University, University of Connecticut, University of Delaware, Washington State University, University of Montana, Seton Hall University, University of Massachusetts-Lowell, and University of North Georgia.

“This article suggests that all students, even ones with the highest entrance scores and most impressive applicant portfolios, should consider attending one of these institutions,” notes Dr. William J. Fritz, Interim President at CSI, adding “I am familiar with all of the other 49 institutions on the list, and we have been placed with some very prestigious company.”

Read the full article at businessinsider.com>

Business Insider and Niche have developed a new ranking model that levels the playing field for public college’s such as CSI,” Dr. Fritz states, “taking into account the breadth of opportunities available and the commitment to the students of our community.”

CSI, home to nearly 15,000 students, was named for the first time as one of America’s Best Colleges in the North by U.S. News & World Report in 2013, and one of “America’s Best-Bang-for-the-Buck Colleges” by Washington Monthly magazine in 2012.

“Recognition leads to confidence by others in our academic mission, which translates into the confidence to invest in resources for faculty and students,” Dr. Fritz concluded.

The rising national profile of CSI is well-timed as the College recently launched the $20 million “Campaign for CSI: For College and Community” to raise much-need funds for faculty support, student support, capital and construction projects, and increasing the College’s endowment.

Business Insider was launched in July 2007 by DoubleClick founders Dwight Merriman and Kevin Ryan, and former top-ranked Wall Street analyst Henry Blodget. In 2013, Amazon.com founder Jeff Bezos invested $5 million in the “leading online business news site for the digital age.”

CSI Ranked Top Military-Friendly School in the Country

G.I. Jobs magazine named the College of Staten Island a Top Military-Friendly School in the country based upon the college’s commitment to serving the needs of students with military experience and its wide array of services designed for student veterans.

This is the fifth year in a row in which CSI was ranked in the top 20 percent of military-friendly colleges, universities, and trade schools in the nation.

Student veterans who enroll at CSI can take full advantage of the services and programs offered by the Veterans Educational Transition Services (VETS), located in the Office of the Registrar, and Veteran’s Support Services (VSS), located in the Campus Center, to facilitate a smooth transition from military to student life for veterans and their families. VETS and VSS provide a strong support system and offer centralized, “vet-friendly” services on campus.

“Vets attending CSI can take advantage of many of our services that aim to fit the specific needs of a military veteran,” said Ann Treadaway, VSS Director. She went on to discuss how CSI and her staff are well equipped to understand and help veterans who attend CSI. “I am a combat veteran myself as is most of my staff. We understand what our veteran students are going through and what they will need to succeed.”

What makes CSI such a military friendly school is not only the knowledgeable and sympathetic staff, but it also honors and cares for veterans while they are on campus. CSI offers the most transferred college credits to veterans than any other school—up to 90 depending on the student’s military training.

Beyond the credits, all incoming veterans and dependents are offered CORE100, a General Education course that satisfies a requirement as well as creates a learning community to assist in their transition. The course provides a platform for veterans to speak out about their experiences while discussing U.S. government, history and economics.

Mrs. Treadaway’s office offers free tutoring for all student veterans and their dependents as well as the ‘vet to vet’ mentoring program, a program that takes advantage of the experiences that vets may have shared to make incoming vets feel more at home. VSS offers numerous services and resources for student veterans and their dependents from translating their military jobs into civilian terms on resumes to helping them navigate the Department of Veterans Affairs to obtain the benefits they have earned.

“We also offer job training and internships,” added Mrs. Treadaway. “Our goal is to have the transition be as smooth as possible.”

Mrs. Treadaway also offered many other little known statistics, underscoring the importance of ensuring CSI remains vet friendly. “Vets are more likely to have a high school diploma but are less likely to have a college degree than the general population,” she began.

“The veteran unemployment rate is also higher than the national average.  CSI is in unique position to help veterans, a population that has doubled on the campus over the last three years and looks to increase even more as New York City is expecting about 6,000 returning vets in the upcoming year,” Mrs. Treadaway added, emphasizing that CSI has done much to “take care of our vets after they have sacrificed so much.”

The CSI VSS and VETS sponsor a number of events each semester. For information about such events, visit http://www.csi.cuny.edu/vets/.

US News & World Report names CSI Best College

The College of Staten Island was included in the 2014 US News & World Report Best Colleges issue for the first time in the college’s 58 year history.

In the Regional Universities (North) category, CSI was ranked 44th among Top Public Schools and 135th in the overall Best Colleges category.  CSI’s national ranking for Nursing is 295 (2011), and Physical Therapy, 172 (2012).

Anita Narayan, Education Editor with US News & World Report states “we offer reliable and consistent data on nearly 1,800 schools to allow [parents and students] to compare them.”

For more information visit usnew.com>

“Washington Monthly” Names CSI one of America’s Best-Bang-for-the-Buck Colleges

"Washington Monthly" has named CSI to its list of the nation's Best-Bang-for-the-Buck Colleges.

Washington Monthly, which publishes an annual rating of colleges throughout the U.S., has recently named the College of Staten Island as one of America’s Best-Bang-for-the-Buck Colleges. The article appears in the magazine’s September-October 2012 issue.

Providing some background for its ranking system, Washington Monthly notes that, in its opinion, other college rankings are often flawed because they tend to measure the level of prestige that institutions have, as opposed to how well they are serving their students. The article further notes that some of the higher-ranking colleges in other lists have often taken the focus off of traditional students in favor of higher-caliber recruits through an increase in admissions standards.

“We are proud that Washington Monthly has recognized the value of the high-quality education offered at the College of Staten Island,” said Dr. William J. Fritz, interim president of CSI. “This national honor is indicative of our renowned faculty, establishment of new national honor societies, construction of world-class residence halls, and the distinction of being ranked as a top military-friendly institution. The CSI community should indeed be proud of this tremendous achievement.”

In regard to these policies, the article explains, “The Washington Monthly has long believed that such behavior by colleges doesn’t serve the broader interests of the country, and that rewarding such behavior is wrong. And so the magazine designed its own ranking system to do the opposite: to rate colleges based on how well they perform with the students they have, regardless of the students’ backgrounds or SAT scores, on metrics that measure the widely shared national goals of increasing social mobility, producing research, and inspiring public service.”

As Washington Monthly ranked U.S. colleges this year, it took another aspect into account—“cost-effectiveness.” Using a measure called “cost-adjusted graduation rate,” which involves, according to the article, “the gap between the predicted and actual graduation rate of a school…divided… by the net price of attending that institution,” the magazine compiled a list of institutions that represented a good investment from the students’ perspective and CSI made the list.

The article notes that “As an urban, commuter institution, the College of Staten Island attracts a diverse group of students from the New York City metro area. Because of the difficulty in retaining commuter students, the college offers many programs to enrich students’ academic lives and provide incentives for them to stay invested in finishing their degree.” The article mentioned the SEEK program, designed for students who have the potential to succeed in college, but would benefit from enhanced academic support and financial assistance, and the three honors programs available to high-achieving students as examples of some of the exceptional value available to students at the College.

Commenting on CSI’s inclusion in this prestigious list, CUNY Senior Vice Chancellor for University Relations and Secretary of the Board of Trustees Jay Hershenson said, “It comes as no surprise that the high-quality academic programs and services available at CSI are widely perceived to be of great value, especially during these difficult economic times. Students and their families are very fortunate to have this jewel of a CUNY college in the crown of Staten Island.”

Read the full article online at WashingtonMonthly.com

 

American Cancer Society Honors CSI

(L-R:) Elizabeth Davis, Dan Hoizner, Karen Klingele, and Robert King Kee

The College of Staten Island was one of two honorees at a gathering of the Staten Island Chapter of the American Cancer Society (ACS) that was held last week at Li Greci’s Staaten. The recognition came as a result of CSI students raising over $25,000 over two years for the ACS’s Relay for Life. The other honoree at the event was Staten Island’s Robert DeFalco Realty.

Three of four CSI students who were on the main planning committee for the CSI Relay, Dan Hoizner, Karen Klingele, and Elizabeth Davis, accepted the award on behalf of the College and College President Dr. Tomás D. Morales. Roxanne Mecurio, the fourth planning committee member, was unable to attend.

Two years ago, the ACS contacted Dr. Morales to solicit support for the event from the College community, after Dr. Morales signed onto the event, the Office of Student Life took the lead, under the supervision of Robert King Kee, Coordinator for Student Leadership Development. Kee initially engaged Emerging Leaders program students, but many other students became involved, resulting in the successful fundraising effort over two years.

In addition to the student contribution to the Relay, the ACS recognized Dr. Morales’s leadership and expeditious response to the call for support.

Other CSI representatives in attendance at the event included CSI Vice President for Institutional Advancement and External Affairs Barbara Eshoo, Robert King Kee, CSI Foundation Vice President Samir Farag, and CSI Academy of Retired Professors Steering Committee member and President of the Staten Island Chapter of the ACS Dr. Ann Merlino.

CSI students are deeply committed to serving the Staten Island community. In 2008 and 2009 the College was named to the President’s Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll, the highest federal recognition a college or university can receive for its commitment to volunteering, service-learning, and civic engagement.

CSI Receives National Recognition for Community Service, Named to President’s Honor Roll

The College of Staten Island has been named to the 2009 President’s Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll, the highest federal recognition a college or university can receive for its commitment to volunteering, service-learning, and civic engagement. This is the second year in a row that the College has received this honor.

The Corporation for National and Community Service, which administers the annual Honor Roll award, recognized more than 700 colleges and universities for their impact on issues from poverty and homelessness to environmental justice. On campuses across the country, thousands of students joined their faculty to develop innovative programs and projects to meet local needs using the skills gained in their classrooms. Business students served as consultants to budget-strapped nonprofits and businesses, law students volunteered at legal clinics, and dozens of others organized anti-hunger campaigns.

“The College of Staten Island epitomizes leadership by example, and I am proud of its longstanding tradition and increasing commitment to public service. This national recognition showcases the dedication that CSI students, faculty, and staff possess, and highlights their dedication to their community,” said Dr. Matthew Goldstein, Chancellor of The City University of New York.”

CSI President Dr. Tomas Morales commented, “I am delighted that CSI has been named to the 2009 President’s Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll for the second year in a row. This is a well-deserved recognition for our students, faculty, staff, and administration who empower our community with the breadth and quality of the outreach services they provide to our off-campus constituents.”

At CSI, students in the Emerging Leaders Program [ELP] always take an active role when it comes to community service. Over the past year they have worked to raise funds and awareness for such worthy programs as the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, the NYC Department of Homeless Services, Reach out and Read of Greater NY, Project Hospitality, Habitat for Humanity, and the Staten Island Zoo, among others.

In addition, students in the Strategies for Success Program spend their volunteer hours mentoring students at I.S. 49 and PS 57. During the 2008/2009 academic year, 26 CSI students from a variety of disciplines mentored over 250 pupils to provide academic support in math, language arts, science, and social studies.

Students enrolled in the Social Work program at the College of Staten Island engage in fieldwork courses
as part of their Professional Foundation Content Requirement. Under the tutelage of veteran social
workers, students are able to put to practical use the theories and skills they learn in the classroom
through their placements in education, health, social service agencies, and other community-based
organizations on Staten Island and throughout New York City. Two particular organizations that have benefited from the diligent efforts of CSI students are the Seamen’s Society for Children and Families and Safe Horizons.

CSI Nursing students also volunteer their time to make New York City a better place to live. Through the Nursing program’s Community Health component, undergraduate and graduate students gain valuable experiences with patients–ranging from infants to senior citizens–that have allowed them to help local residents while encouraging the students in their pursuit of a career in health care. With the growing H1N1 epidemic, nursing students have also helped with efforts to prevent a national health crisis.

There are also many other opportunities for CSI students to perform community service, as the Office of Student Life facilitates a volunteer event of the month whereby students pair up to support local nonprofit organizations like Project Hospitality and the American Cancer Society.

Nationwide, college students make a significant contribution to the volunteer sector; in 2009, 3.16 million students performed more than 300 million hours of service, according to the Volunteering in America study released by the Corporation. Each year, the Corporation invests more than $150 million in fostering a culture of service on college campuses through grants awarded by its programs; the education awards that AmeriCorps members receive at the conclusion of their term of service to pay for college; and through support of training, research, recognition, and other initiatives to spur college service.

“Congratulations to CSI and its students for their dedication to service and commitment to improving their local communities,” said Patrick Corvington, CEO of the Corporation for National and Community Service. “Our nation’s students are a critical part of the equation and vital to our efforts to tackle the most persistent challenges we face. They have achieved impactful results and demonstrated the value of putting knowledge into practice to help renew America through service.”

The Corporation oversees the Honor Roll in collaboration with the Department of Education, the Department of Housing and Urban Development, Campus Compact, and the American Council on Education. Click Here for more information.

Student community service has, once again, earned the College a place on the President's Honor Roll.