New York Needs You Fellowship Program

The New York Needs You Fellowship Program (NYNY) is now accepting applications.

New York Needs You (NYNY) is a two-year career, leadership development, and scholarship opportunity designed to help ambitious, first-generation college students realize their full potential. Through the program, students have the opportunity to explore careers, build their professional networks, develop important skills, work on improving their communities, and qualify for a $2,500 grant to be used toward education expenses. In order to apply, applicants must meet the following criteria:

-Have completed at least 12 but no more than 36 credits

-Be a first-generation college student from a low-income household, as demonstrated by receipt of financial aid

-Have a 3.25 or higher GPA

-Be a U.S. citizen or permanent resident

-Be willing and able to commit to an intensive two-year program that includes biweekly, five-hour Saturday workshops and meetings with mentor-coaches

The program is open to a variety of majors, including students who have not yet determined their career goals.

The application deadline is Tuesday, Mar. 8, 2011. For more information, visit the NYNY Website  to download an application. Students interested in applying may contact Dr. Geoff Hempill at geoffrey.hempill@csi.cuny.edu or 718.982.2301 for assistance with their applications. Further information can also be found in the Career and Scholarship Center in Building 1A, Room 105.

Music Hour Recital

The Music Program of the Department of Performing and Creative Arts presents a Music Hour Recital featuring The OMNI Ensemble on Thursday, Feb. 17 in the Center for the Arts (Building 1P) Recital Hall at 1:30pm. 

The program will include Apollo (New York Premiere) by Paul Stanhope, Canzoni  Per Sonar a 4 by Giovanni Gabrieli, Louie’s Orange Element for Octet (World Premiere) by David Wechsler, Divertimento No. 4 in C and Divertimento No. 5 in B flat by W. A. Mozart, and the Octet for Wind Instruments by Igor Stravinsky.  

The OMNI Ensemble features David Wechsler, flute and Music Director with guest artists: Jeff Adler, clarinet; Atsuko Sato, Alden Banta, bassoons; Chris Bubolz, Michael Morreale, trumpets; and Julie Josephson, Joel Shelton, trombones.  

Admission is free. For more information, contact William R. Bauer, Coordinator of Concerts and Lectures at bill.bauer@csi.cuny.edu or at 718.982.2534.

Nan Sussman Appears in Shanghai Daily Newspaper, February 10, 2011

Returning ‘turtles’ no longer treated like conquering heroes
By Ni Tao (The story appears on Page A6 of print edition)

MY first contact with a Chinese returnee, or hai gui, took place when I was seven, when a friend of my mother’s came back from Japan. After working there at a factory processing raw fish products for three years, she made quite a fortune and radiated grace and opulence.

She was among the first generation of highly unskilled hai gui, literally translated as “sea turtles,” to be followed by a steady trickle of student returnees, who brought with them skills and expertise that set the nation on a path that globalized its economy. Returnees’ success stories strengthened my belief that overseas experience is necessary to build a good career.

That belief has largely fallen apart. As domestic companies begin to stress real ability over foreign diplomas in recruiting new hires, “sea turtles” now find themselves on the shallow side of an increasingly crowded talent pool. Unless they are of the highest caliber, and thus are wooed, they have no apparent edge over local job-seekers other than English proficiency. As a popular joke has it, “sea turtles” have become “seaweeds,” or hai dai, referring to their modest social status.

And the pressure in finding jobs is just one aspect of a double whammy they may face once “home.” Their overseas experience can be a source of what some scholars call the “reverse culture shock” that causes tremendous psychological stress.

While the effect of “reverse culture shock” remains to be seen among Chinese returnees, it has also been proven to exist among certain people, according to Nan M. Sussman, psychology professor at the College of Staten Island, City University of New York.

In an interview on January 27, Professor Sussman told Shanghai Daily that Europeans and Americans fall into the category she termed “subtractive” in their self-identification, which means they can no longer feel as American or European as they did before settling in another country.

Life back “home” is often so miserable that they change residences, quit jobs and even divorce spouses to try to relieve stress, only to find moving back to their adopted new homes can cure culture shock, said Sussman.

Unlike the Westerners, the Chinese have displayed remarkable flexibility in this regard, especially the Hong Kongers. In her new book “Return Migration and Identity: A Global Phenomenon, A Hong Kong Case,” Sussman traces the “out and back” migration of Hong Kongers before and after Hong Kong’s return to China in 1997.

Sussman argues that few Hong Kong returnees suffered the same kind of mental stress as do Westerners. Lured back to Hong Kong by the economic opportunities and the pull of home, they could fit in again without feeling ill at ease after living for an extended period in Australia and Canada, two of the largest receiving nations, despite the very different lifestyles they represent – Hong Kong fast-paced, Australia and Canada laid-back.

This is because, as Sussman explained, Hong Kongers are a product of the Confucian culture, where emphasis on harmony allows for the blurring of identity boundaries. Hence Hong Kong emigrants don’t lose home culture, rather, they add many layers to their identity.

Whereas in the West, based on Greek philosophy, identity is monolithic (less malleable). It has to be one way or the other, not both. And that is why Westerners cannot switch as easily as the Hong Kongers between different roles, said Sussman. While the Hong Kong case is indeed interesting, Sussman said the city may be a unique example in which “sea turtles” swim effortlessly in local currents, due to its mixture of pragmatism and cosmopolitanism.

Things may be more complex on the mainland. We’ve already seen small ways in which the returnees are now behaving differently from the local norm, and feeling awkward as a result.

Nominations for the 2010-2011 Dolphin Awards

All members of the College community are invited and encouraged to submit nominations to the 2010-2011 Dolphin Awards Committee. The deadline is Tuesday, Mar. 8, 2011.

The Dolphin Award, instituted in 1980, is given by the President to select faculty, staff, and students in recognition of their contribution and achievements. The awards in ten categories are bestowed annually and are formally presented on the day of the College’s Commencement.

For all Dolphin Awards, the committee will consider length of service, a sustained contribution over many years, or an exceptional recent contribution. A detailed statement of the achievements of the candidate should support nominations.  Nominators are encouraged to provide only those supporting documents that are listed for each award category. In all cases, any records related to personnel issues should not be included in the nomination package.

Where to Send Nominations:
 
Please email your nomination materials to the Office of Academic Affairs to the attention of Barbara Verteramo, barbara.verteramo@csi.cuny.edu. If you cannot submit your nominations via email, please send three copies of your nomination materials to the Office of Academic Affairs, Building 1A, Room 305 (Attention: Barbara Verteramo) by
Tuesday, Mar. 8, 2011. Any questions related to Dolphin Awards may be directed to Marie Anderson, by email marie.anderson@csi.cuny.edu, or by phone at 718.982.2444.
 
I. Award Categories and Suggested Documents:

1. Outstanding Scholarly Achievement by a Member of the Full-time Faculty (includes, teaching, library, and student services faculty). Suggested documents: Current curriculum vitae and letters of support (three maximum).

2. Outstanding Teaching by a Member of the Full-time Faculty (includes only teaching faculty). Suggested documents: Current curriculum vitae and evidence of recognition by students or peers, such as letters from colleagues, letters from students, and/or letters from alumna/us (three maximum), and peer and/or student evaluations. (Peer or student evaluations can be sent only by permission of the candidate.)

3. Outstanding Teaching by a Member of the Adjunct Faculty (includes only teaching faculty). Suggested documents: Current curriculum vitae and evidence of recognition by students or peers, such as letters from colleagues, letters from students, and/or letters from alumna/us (three maximum), and peer and/or student evaluations. (Peer or student evaluations can be sent only by permission of the candidate.) Please note that the individual who has been nominated must have taught as an adjunct in the 2010-2011 academic year.

4. Outstanding Service and Contribution to the College by a Member of the Full-time Faculty. Suggested documents: Current curriculum vitae and letters of support from colleagues (three maximum).
 
5. Outstanding Service and Contribution to the College by a Member of the Non-teaching Instructional Staff in the HEO title. Suggested documents: Letters from supervisors and/or colleagues (three maximum).

6. Outstanding Service and Contribution to the College by a member of the Non-teaching Instructional Staff in the CLT and OIT specialist titles. Suggested documents: Letters from supervisors and/or colleagues (three maximum).

7. Outstanding Service and Contribution to the College by a member of the Non-instructional Staff in Clerical Functions. Suggested documents: Letters from supervisors and/or colleagues (three maximum).

8. Outstanding Service and Contribution to the College by a Member of the Non-Instructional Staff in Maintenance, Operations, Security, Service, and Support Functions. Suggested documents: Letters from supervisors and/or colleagues (three maximum).

9. Outstanding Service and Contribution to the College by a Member of the Part-time Non-teaching Staff. Suggested documents: Letters from supervisors and/or colleagues (three maximum).

10. Outstanding Service and Contribution to the College by a currently enrolled student (minimum GPA of 3.0). Suggested documents: Letters from faculty, staff members, or a student (three maximum, of which one can be from a fellow student).

II. Eligibility for Nomination:
   
All active members of the College faculty and staff, including those on tax levy and non-tax levy payrolls working at the College, and current students are eligible for nomination. Self-nominations are discouraged.

Past award recipients are eligible for nomination in categories other than the one(s) in which the award was previously conferred. Members of the selection committee are not eligible for nomination.

III. 2010-2011 Dolphin Awards Committee:

Margaret Lunney (2007-2008 recipient of Dolphin Award for Outstanding Scholarly Achievement by the Member of the Full-time Faculty), David Falk (2009-2010 recipient of Dolphin Award for Outstanding Teaching by a Member of the Faculty), Tom Mormino (2009-2010 recipient of Dolphin Award for Outstanding Teaching by a Member of the Adjunct Faculty), Richard Flanagan (2008-2009 recipient of the Dolphin Award for Outstanding Service and Contribution to the College by a Member of the Full-time Faculty), Manuel Gonzalez (2009-2010 recipient of Dolphin Award for Outstanding Service and Contribution to the College by a Member of the Non-teaching Instructional Staff), Valeria Belmonti (2009-2010 recipient of Dolphin Award for Outstanding Service and Contribution to the College by a Member of the Non-instructional Staff in CLT and OIT Specialist Title), Florinda Mattia (2009-2010 recipient of the Dolphin Award for Outstanding Service and Contribution by a member of the Non-Instructional Staff in Clerical Functions), Vincent Bono (2009-2010 recipient of the Dolphin Award for Outstanding Service and Contribution by a Member of the Non-instructional Staff in Maintenance, Operations, Security, Service, and Support Functions), BiBi Ghafari (currently enrolled student), William Fritz (Provost/Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs), Milton Santiago (Vice President for Administration and Finance), Michael Kress (Vice President for Technology Systems), Barbara Eshoo (Vice President for Institutional Advancement and External Affairs), A. Ramona Brown (Vice President for Student Affairs). Additional non-voting members include: Christine Flynn Saulnier (Dean of Humanities and Social Sciences), Alfred Levine (Interim Dean of Science and Technology), and E.K. (Eun) Park (Dean of Research and Graduate Studies).

Following the deliberations, the committee will submit its recommendations to the President for his decision.

Petrie Student Emergency Grant Fund

I am pleased to announce that the College’s receipt of a grant of up to $300,000 from the Carroll and Milton Petrie Foundation to support the Petrie Student Emergency Grant Fund. This fund was created for the purpose of providing quick response grants to matriculated CSI students with short-term financial emergencies to enable them to remain in school, rather than being forced to take a leave of absence or drop out.

Students who demonstrate need and are facing a current unexpected emergency may apply for this grant. All grants are subject to approval with documentation and verification to support the application. Examples of emergencies to be considered include, but are not limited to: uninsured medical bills, travel home for illness or death in the family, theft of books or other essential academic belongings, temporary job loss, etc. The maximum cash award amount is $1,500 Only in extraordinary circumstances, and with appropriate documentation, will an award exceed $1,500.

Applicants are required to meet with a counselor to assess the merits of the emergency grant request. The Emergency Assistance Committee of the Office of Student Affairs, the Office of Financial Aid, and other student services offices will review applications and make recommendations. Final approval rests with the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs. Questions may be directed to the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs, (Building 1A, Room 301; 718.982.2335).

Visit the Petrie Grant Web site for full guidelines and other relevant information.  An application may be downloaded from that site, as well. Applications are also available in the offices listed below.

Petrie Student Emergency Assistance Committee Members:

  • Dr. A. Ramona Brown, Chairperson
  • Dean Frederick J. Kogut, Vice Chair
  • Ms. Donna Brogna, Financial Aid, 2A-401C
  • Ms. Carol Brower, Student Life, 1C-201
  • Ms. Linda Conte, Health and Wellness Services, 1C-112
  • Ms. Debra Evans-Green, Access and Success Program, 1A-310
  • Ms. Stefanie Gardiner, Financial Aid, 2A-401C
  • Ms. Harriet Giapoutzis, COPE, 1A-109A
  • Mr. Philippe Marius, Financial Aid, 2A-401C
  • Ms. Miriam Perez-Lai, SEEK Program, 1A-112G

Assistant Vice President Appointment

Following a nationwide search and extensive campus participation, I am pleased to announce the appointment of Dr. Kenneth Boyden as the Assistant Vice President for Institutional Advancement and External Affairs at the College, effective Monday, Feb. 7, 2011. 

Dr. Boyden previously served as Vice President for Institutional Advancement at Cabrini College and at Valley Forge Military Academy and College. He was Director of the Capital Campaign and Major Gifts at the University of the Sciences in Philadelphia, where he was later promoted to Vice President. 

Dr. Boyden holds a Doctor of Education in Higher Education Management degree from the University of Pennsylvania and a Juris Doctor from The Dickenson School of Law of Pennsylvania State University. His Bachelor’s degree, with honors, is from West Chester University.

Dr. Boyden has a history of securing unprecedented support for his previous institutions, has expertise in the launch and management of highly successful capital campaigns, and has proven strategies for increasing philanthropic participation with alumni. He is a member of the American Bar Association and the Pennsylvania Bar Association.

I commend the work of the search committee chaired by Professor David Bloomfield, Chair of the Education Department. The Committee’s diligence produced an outstanding pool of candidates, and its hard work ensured a successful outcome of this important search.

High-Performance Computing on CUNY’s Cray XE6

The CUNY High-Performance Computing Center is excited to offer early access to its new 1,280 CPU Cray XE6 supercomputer to those attending its first workshop on the Unified Parallel C (UPC) and Co-Array Fortran (CAF) on Friday, Mar. 11 in Building 1N, Room 005 from 9:00am to 5:00pm. 

Through simple modifications to C and Fortran, UPC and CAF allow application developers to write parallel code without using the messagepassing interface (MPI) library. Easier to program than traditional approaches with MPI, UPC and CAF support fine-grain parallelism and provides compiler-based debugging for the entire application. This  class will introduce the features of these parallel language extensions, and provide hands-on training with exercises for the new Cray XE6.

Topic that will be covered include:

-Overview and comparison to MPI
-Introduction to the syntax and semantics of UPC and CAF
-Examples, including collectives, linear algebra algorithms for operations, and halo-update techniques for partial differential equations.
-Hands-on exercises

To register for a seat for this class, please fill out an application.

AARP Women’s Scholarship Program

The AARP Women’s Scholarship Program is now accepting applications.

The AARP Foundation Women’s Scholarship Program provides scholarship funds to women 40 years of age or older who have limited financial resources. To be eligible, applicants must be women who are at least 40 years of age by Thursday, Mar. 31, 2011, and are able to demonstrate financial need. Priority is given to women who have been out of the workforce for more than five years, are in low-paying jobs with limited career opportunities or benefits, or are raising the children of another family member.

The application deadline is Thursday, Mar. 31, 2011. For more information, visit the AARP Women’s Scholarship Program Website  to submit an application. Students interested in applying may contact Dr. Geoff Hempill at geoffrey.hempill@csi.cuny.edu or 718.982.2301 for assistance with their applications. Further information can also be found in the Career and Scholarship Center in Building 1A, Room 105.