This Week in Core 100

The Core 100 program invites students and faculty from the College to join us for our weekly lecture series. Each week, all of the first-year students participate in lecture-discussions with about 400 of their classmates. We have space in the Center for the Arts (Building 1P) Williamson Theatre to accommodate individual guests (no permission needed) and can have as many as two additional classes at each of the lectures. Permission is not necessary for classes to attend, but please notify Donna Scimeca at 718.982.3405 if you plan to bring a class.

The lectures are 50 minutes in length and are all in the Williamson Theatre. They meet on the following days/times: Wednesdays at 12:20pm and 3:35pm, and on Thursdays at 8:00am, 10:10am, 4:40pm, and 6:30pm.

In the fall, the Saturday 10:10am lectures are held in the Williamson Theatre, but due to space limitations, we unfortunately cannot accommodate additional classes.

The Lecture Series schedule for the Week of February 29, 2016 is as follows:

Wednesday, Mar. 2:

12:20pm: “The “Imperial” Supreme Court,” presented by Ed Manganel

This lecture will discuss the power and influence of the U.S. Supreme Court in contemporary American life and culture and the judicial appointment process, now in motion, to replace Justice Antonin Scalia. An important question: How will the ideological balance of the Court be affected, if the Senate confirms President Obama’s nominee?

Professor Manganel received his BA from Marist College in American History/Political Science, and his MA from the University of Colorado in American History. He is the former Chair of the Social Studies Department and AP U.S. history teacher at Monsignor Farrell HS. He has also been an Adjunct Professor at CSI for 20 years.

Thursday, Mar.3:

8:00am: “Slavery: The Peculiar Institution,” presented by Annette Marks-Ellis

This lecture is an audiovisual interactive look at the origins of slavery and its legacies. Members of the audience will view the captive process that was conducted in Africa, the Middle Passage to the New World, the auction block experience, and plantation life. An overview of the legacies of slavery will be addressed and discussed. A connection between feminism and abolitionism will also be covered.

Annette Marks-Ellis earned her undergraduate and graduate degrees at Columbia University. She has been at CSI and teaching Core 100 since 1999. She has published several articles on African American history, women’s issues, and Caribbean culture.

10:10am: “The Electoral Process,” presented by Ed Manganel

In November 2016, after almost four years of media hype, political circus, and endless, often mind-numbing debates, Americans will choose their next President. This lecture will examine the controversial presidential electoral process, why the Founding Fathers created it, the potential and occasional real problems inherent in the process, and the extent to which the system is democratic.

Professor Manganel received his BA from Marist College in American History/Political Science, and his MA from the University of Colorado in American History. He is the former Chair of the Social Studies Department and AP U.S. history teacher at Monsignor Farrell HS. He has also been an Adjunct Professor at CSI for 20 years.

4:40pm and 6:30pm: “The Underground Railroad, Escape from the Bonds,” presented by John Comfort

During this lecture, Mr. Comform will talk about the beginnings of the Underground Railroad; how the name, The Underground Railroad, came to be; and the importance of this network. What was the impact of the Fugitive Slave Act on the Underground Railroad? He will also discuss the hard decision a slave would have to make if he/she wanted to escape. How would a slave know where to go? How would they know which houses were “safe houses?” Which notable participants made important contributions to the Underground Railroad and helped slaves escape from their bonds?

John Comfort earned his MA in History from the College of Staten Island in 2003 and has taught classes at CSI in the Core program and also the American Studies program since 2006.