Student Refunds and Credit/No Credit Grading Policy

As we have transitioned to remote learning, many students have submitted questions on whether some financial consideration would be given for Dormitory Fees and Student Activity Fees. Last night, the CUNY Board of Trustees addressed both of these issues.  ​

Dormitory Fees

·        For continuing students a credit for dormitory fees will be given, on a prorated basis from the move-out date, provided the students are, (i) are in good standing at their institutions; (ii) have paid their bills in full for the spring 2020 semester; and (iii) have vacated the University dormitories as part of the University’s efforts to protect students from the spread of COVID-19. The credit may be applied to either the Summer 2020 or Fall 2020 semester.

·        For students who are graduating, a refund of dormitory fees will be given on a prorated basis from the move-out date, to students scheduled to graduate who, as of the date hereof: (i) are in good standing at their institution; (ii) have paid their bills in full for the spring 2020 semester; (iii) have vacated the University dormitories as part of the University’s efforts to protect students from the spread of COVID-19; and (iv) are scheduled to graduate at the end of the current spring 2020 semester.

Student Activity Fees

·        For all students, the Board resolved to waive (i) twenty-five percent (25%) of the Spring 2020 Student Activity Fee for students enrolled on a fifteen (15) week calendar; and (ii) fifty percent (50%) of the Student Activity Fee for students enrolled in those University schools and colleges on twelve (12)- or six (6)-week calendars, in recognition that some services relating to such Student Activity Fees could not be performed by the University due to the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic.

·        The portion of the Fee that supports the activities of the University Student Senate will not be waived.

Credit/No Credit Grading

In addition to addressing these Fees, the Board adopted a policy on Credit/No Credit grading.

During the Spring 2020 semester, all students shall have the option to convert any or all of the (A-F) letter grades they earn in their classes, to Credit/No Credit grading. The policy provides:

·        Students shall be able to make this decision up to 20 business days after the University’s final grade submission deadline. Once selected, the CR/NC option cannot be cannot be reversed.

·        If a student chooses to exercise this option, a passing letter grade (A, B, C, or D) will convert to ‘CR’ with credit for the class being awarded, while a failing grade (F) will convert to ‘NC’, with no credit awarded. Credit/No Credit grades will not impact the student’s GPA.

·        Courses taken for a letter grade will continue to be included in the semester and general GPA, while courses taken for a Credit/Non-credit grade will be excluded, just as is the case with such courses taken at a student’s home institution.

·        If a student exercises the option of Credit/No Credit, the Credit (CR) grade will not negatively impact the student’s satisfactory progress toward degree completion.

·        Students with Credit/No Credit grades will be able to transfer those courses across colleges within CUNY, per current CUNY policy.

·        The Special COVID-19 Flexible Grading Policy shall apply to coursework completed on Permit and will not affect Board of Trustees Policy 1.14 – Policy on Coursework Completed on Permit.

·        Students placed on academic probation by their institution at the start of the Spring 2020 semester shall not be penalized with academic dismissal based upon their grades earned this semester.

·        The Special COVID-19 Flexible Grading Policy shall not affect the University standards of student retention and progress in accordance with Board of Trustees Policy 1.26.

·        Before choosing this grading option for one or more of their classes, students shall consult with their academic and financial aid advisors regarding potential impact to their financial aid, licensure requirements, and graduate school admissions.

By Jennifer S. Borrero