Historians and Educators to Gather at CSI to Celebrate Staten Island in American History and 21st Century Education

CSI will host “Staten Island in American History and 21st Century Education,” a special event to celebrate Staten Island’s 350th anniversary.

Public School teachers, principals, pre-service teachers, educators, scholars in all academic fields, and the general public are invited to a special event to celebrate Staten Island’s 350th anniversary.

The College of Staten Island will host a two-day Academic Conference and Education Symposium entitled “Staten Island in American History and 21st Century Education” to take place at the Center for the Arts on March 19 and 20, 2011. The conference is a culmination of SI350’s recent “Call for Papers” and “Call for Teacher’s Guides.”

Three Colleges Award 18 Teacher’s Guides

A panel of judges, consisting of educational faculty from CSI, Wagner College, and St. John’s University, will choose 18 of the best submissions and  the developers will be invited to present their work during the first day of the Symposium. The six of the chosen guides will align with the curriculum of the elementary grades, another six will align with middle school, and the remaining six will align with secondary school.The best submission in each category will receive a prize of $1,000, and the runner-up will receive $250.

Submissions have been received, mostly from undergraduate and graduate students of education, many of whom are teaching in K-12 grades in Staten Island schools during the day, and who continue to further their formal teacher education during the evening. Examples of sites for which guides have been developed vary from well known historic sites, such as the Conference House, 9/11 Monument, Alice Austen House, or Sandy Ground, to less well-known sites, such as St. Peter’s Roman Catholic Church, Mount Loretto, or Clay Pit Pond. Also represented are guides that highlight the teaching and learning opportunities found in the study of important ethnic sites such as Killmeyer’s Old Bavaria Inn.

Two Keynotes: Six City and State Historians

The Conference will feature two keynote speakers: Carmen Farina, who has served for more than 40 years in public education, most recently as Deputy Chancellor for New York City Public Schools, and is the author of Making Connections, a multicultural/ interdisciplinary program focusing on Social Studies education; and Kenneth T. Jackson, the Jacques Barzun Professor of History and Social Sciences at Columbia University.

In addition the plenary session of the conference will bring together the five NYC borough historians and the New York State historian to discuss the topic: “1898: New York City’s Consolidation and its Ramifications.”

Community as Classroom

The call to develop teacher guides to any one of the 350 sites identified as sites of historical and cultural importance on Staten Island is founded on the theory of Place-based Education (PBL).  “The theory promotes learning that is rooted in what is local – the unique history, environment, culture, economy, literature, and art of a particular place–that is the students’ own place,” explained Dr. Margaret Bérci, Associate Professor of Education at CSI and co-chair of SI350 Academic Conference/Symposium.

Bérci noted that “although PBL is a great way to teach and learn, it takes a concentrated effort and extensive time commitment on the part of the teacher to develop effective PBL lesson plans.”  To that end, Bérci has incorporated the Teacher Guide Contest, as a case of PBL, into curriculum/pedagogy courses at CSI. As a result, many of the CSI Education students entered the contest with original guides containing extended lesson plans.

Curriculum-based Guides Available to Educators

“Development of these teacher guides has proved to be a great learning activity for pre-service teachers. Rather than simply working through a classroom exercise, the contest provided heightened incentive and interest in the alignment of PBL with the curriculum and the pedagogy of social studies,” Bérci noted. “The guides, representing the best of those submitted to the contest, include lesson plans for the pre-visit, site visit, and post-visit activities that align with national and NY State education curriculum standards; they are comprehensive in scope, and include extensive resource lists and background information in the content knowledge imbedded in the site, in which teachers need to be fluent.”

“Staten Island teachers who attend the symposium will take home great ideas that will help them to infuse their teaching with the benefits of PBL, knowledge of the immediate community and its place in the history of NY, USA, and beyond,” stressed Bérci. “The presentation of the guides, by those who developed them, will provide an opportunity for those attending to question and engage their colleagues in curriculum and pedagogy discussion.”

Bérci encourages “all K-12 teachers and principals to attend the event, as the scholarly papers will shed light on many aspects of Staten Island’s rich history and will also prove to be an invaluable resource for all educators on Staten Island.”  Bérci added that “by using the guides, teachers can easily incorporate significant sites into their teaching, and pre-service teachers can use the format of the guides as a learning tool and model as they begin to create their own lesson plans. Aside from being introduced to ideas from respected researchers and educators, the conference, as a whole, gives area teachers an opportunity to learn facts about Staten Island that they may not have known, to be introduced to a variety of perspectives on their community, and to gather ready-made teaching resources and methodology with which to engage their students in the knowledge they gleaned.”

The “Call for Papers” invited scholars from around the world to submit a research paper highlighting Staten Island’s place in history and in education. A large number of papers were submitted from inside and outside of the U.S., which shows that Staten Island’s impact is rich and long reaching.  All submissions were peer reviewed; 57 individual papers and three roundtable symposiums were accepted for presentation.

The “Call for Teacher’s Guides” is a contest inviting in-service and pre-service teachers to develop comprehensive curriculum-based teaching guides for use by public school teachers. The education symposium and contest is supported by a $10,000 matching grant from the Staten Island Foundation in order to promote learning and teaching about “our shared and diverse past.”

The “Staten Island in American History and 21st Century Education” event is co-chaired by Dr. Margaret Bérci and Dr. Philip Papas, Professor of History at Union County College. It is part of an ongoing effort by the Staten Island Foundation, CSI, St. John’s University, and Wagner College to foster a better understanding of Staten Island’s influential history by aiding the Island’s teachers in gathering the information and incorporating it into their lessons.

The College of Staten Island Center for the Arts is located at 2800 Victory Boulevard in Willowbrook. For more information about the event please contact: Dr. M. E. Bérci, Associate Professor of Education, CSI, Co-chair of the Conference on Staten Island in American History and 21st Century Education at margaret.berci@csi.cuny.edu or Dr. Philip Papas, Associate Professor of History, UCC, Co-chair of the Conference on Staten Island in American History and 21st Century Education at papas@ucc.edu.

Como Named Clinical Nurse Specialist of the Year by the NACNS

CSI's June M. Como has received the Clinical Nurse Specialist of the Year award from the National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists.

June M. Como, Lecturer of Nursing at the College of Staten Island, has received the Clinical Nurse Specialist of the Year award from the National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists (NACNS).

The award recognizes NACNS members for their outstanding professional achievements as Clinical Nurse Specialist Educators. Professor Como will be officially recognized at the NACNS annual awards luncheon on Friday, March 11 in Baltimore. 

Professor Como, who began her nursing career at CSI (she was a member of the final class of Staten Island Community College) said that she was “extremely excited and very humbled,” when she was nominated by Dr. Margaret Lunney of CSI’s Nursing Department. 

“Teaching is an important component of my life,” commented Como. “Being able to guide my graduate students toward their practice as CNSs in Advanced-Practice Nursing, assisting them in providing the highest level of evidenced-based patient-focused care, and implementing system-level changes in their respective health care settings is wonderfully fulfilling.”

Professor Como’s list of accomplishments is long and impressive, but perhaps none is more impressive than her work during 9/11 setting up a nurses’ health care and first aid center at the Staten Island Homeport. She spent nearly three months organizing health care coverage for personnel at Ground Zero. 

Professor Como is also the co-director of the CSI High-Fidelity Simulation Center where her students use mannequins to simulate real clinical circumstances. The mannequins have heart rates, blood pressure, and working lungs. “It is important that students experience a level of patient care in a safe environment where mistakes are not as costly,” she said. 

“Como’s dedication to the Staten Island community and to the development of CNS students through technology and leadership training is what helps set her apart from other members of her field. Como is a true leader in her field and the members of the CSI community are proud to call her their own,” CSI Provost and SeniorVice President for Academic Affairs Dr. William Fritz commented.

Como began her teaching career as a Critical Care Instructor at Methodist Hospital and has been teaching at CSI since 1992. She is the recipient of a number of awards and grants, earning tens of thousands of dollars as the Principal Investigator (PI) for several projects that use different aspects of technology to assist students in acquiring the critical thinking traits and skills in the nursing diagnosis, care, and evaluation of patients, families, and communities. She has published several articles in health care journals such as the International Journal of Human Caring and Holistic Nursing Practice. Her doctoral focus is on health literacy, medication adherence, and health outcomes in patients with heart failure. 

The NACNS was founded in 1995 to enhance and promote the valuable contributions of clinical nurse specialists to the health care industry. Members are highly influential in the nursing industry. They aid in the development of CNS education standards and support state-specific legislative initiatives. 

The Nursing program at CSI is one of the College’s longest-running programs, dating back to the 1960s when CSI was known as Staten Island Community College. Today, the Department has grown into one of CSI’s flagship programs, offering Master’s and Nurse Specialist degrees. CSI nursing graduates are employed in a variety of institutions throughout the city.

Schulman Named Distinguished Professor

The Board of Trustees of The City University of New York has appointed CSI English Professor Sarah Schulman as Distinguished Professor.

The Board of Trustees of The City University of New York has approved the appointment of Professor Sarah Schulman as Distinguished Professor.

Professor Schulman is a tenured Full Professor in the Department of English and has been at CSI and CUNY since 1999. She made significant contributions across disciplines at national and international levels. Her work has made an invaluable impact in creative writing, theater, film, and, not least of all, gay and lesbian culture. Her art and political practices are known for their integrated multi-mediated approaches.

Commenting on her appointment, Schulman said, “This is, of course, a life-changing moment of recognition for me, and I am especially proud as a second-generation product of New York City public schools. My mother grew up in Brownsville/East New York, attended Thomas Jefferson High School, and was in the first class of women at City College in 1949, when women had to have higher GPAs than men to be admitted. I went to Hunter High School and to Hunter College, where I studied with Audre Lorde, an experience that has enriched me all my life. But really what is most meaningful for me about this promotion is that writing about Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgendered people and people with AIDS, is finally being recognized as an organic and fundamental part of American Arts and Letters.”

Professor Schulman has published prolifically during her career: nine novels, four works of non-fiction, and one play. Her work has been translated into nine languages and has been included in scores of anthologies. She has produced more than a dozen plays in theaters and other performance venues. Her work in the arts has gained her Fulbright and Guggenheim Fellowships. This past year, her co-authored screenplay, The Owls, premiered at the prestigious Berlin Film Festival. As a journalist, her work has appeared in The New York Times, The Guardian of London, The Nation, The Village Voice, Mother Jones, Interview, The Progressive, American Theater, Millennium Film Journal, and others.

Professor Schulman’s many contributions dedicated to the cultural and political spheres of LGBTQ arts and ideas were recently honored with the David R. Kessler Lecture and Award in LGBTQ Studies at the CUNY Graduate Center. This past year Professor Schulman was also appointed to the Advisory Council of the Harvard Kennedy School, Carr Center for Human Rights and Social Movements.

“I have had some extraordinary students here at CSI,” Schulman added, “who I believe in and who deserve to advance and become leaders of our community and country. I worry that our most gifted students are not always getting the opportunities that they deserve and I hope that, as a teacher, I can relate to each of my students as an individual, both of us working to form a distinct partnership in learning, so that whatever they bring to the table can be recognized and enhanced by our collaboration.”

Faculty Promotions

CSI President Dr. Tomás D. Morales and I am pleased to announce the following promotions, effective Saturday, Jan. 1, 2011:

FROM ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR TO FULL PROFESSOR:

  • Christina Tortora-English Department
  • Irina Lyublinskaya-Education Department
  • William L’Amoreaux-Biology Department
  • Carlo Lancellotti-Mathematics Department
  • Chwen Yang Shew-Chemistry Department
  • Wilma Jones-Library Department
  • Ben Kest-Psychology Department

FROM ASSISTANT PROFESSOR TO ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR:

  • Alyson Bardsley-English Department
  • Soon Chun-Business Department
  • Kathleen Cumiskey-Psychology Department
  • Rafael de la Dehesa-Sociology, Anthropology, and Social Work Department
  • Ismael Garcia Colon-Sociology, Anthropology, and Social Work Department
  • Dalia Kandiyoti-English Department
  • Jinyoung Kim-Education Department
  • Beatrix Reinhardt-Performing and Creative Arts Department
  • Terry Rowden-English Department
  • Yumei Huo-Computer Science Department
  • Arlene Farren-Nursing Department
  • Ilya Kofman-Mathematics Department
  • Kevin O’Bryant-Mathematics Department
  • Michal Kruk-Chemistry Department

FROM CLT TO SENIOR CLT:

  • Kristen Lindtvedt-Academic Affairs
  • Jackeline Figueroa-Engineering Science and Physics Department
  • Soa Dang-Chemistry Department
  • Joanne Camhi-Animal Facility
  • Stephen Gundry-Engineering Science and Physics Department

In addition to the promotions listed above, I am pleased to announce that the Board of Trustees approved the appointment of Professor Sarah Schulman as Distinguished Professor.

Professor Schulman is a tenured Full Professor in the Department of English and has been at CSI and CUNY since 1999. Professor Schulman made significant contributions across disciplines at national and international levels. Her work has made an invaluable impact in creative writing, theater, film, and, not least of all, gay and lesbian culture. Her art and political practices are known for their integrated multi-mediated approaches.

Professor Schulman has published prolifically during her career: nine novels, four works of non-fiction, and one play. Her work has been translated into nine languages and has been included in scores of anthologies. She has produced more than a dozen plays in theaters and other performance venues. Her work in the arts has gained her Fulbright and Guggenheim Fellowships. This past year, her co-authored screenplay, The Owls, premiered at the prestigious Berlin Film Festival. As a journalist, her work has appeared in The New York Times, The Guardian of London, The Nation, The Village Voice, Mother Jones, Interview, The Progressive, American Theater, Millennium Film Journal, and others.

Professor Schulman’s many contributions dedicated to the cultural and political spheres of LGBTQ arts and ideas were recently honored with the David R. Kessler Lecture and Award in LGBTQ Studies at the CUNY Graduate Center. This past year Professor Schulman was also appointed to the Advisory Council of the Harvard Kennedy School, Carr Center for Human Rights and Social Movements.

I extend my sincerest congratulations to all those who were promoted.

[video] Award-Winning Professor Joins Shanghai Winter Session Lineup

A cruise along the Pu Jiang River with Shanghai’s famous Bund in the background is the World Class-room for CSI and CUNY students this January.

CSI’s Center for International Service has been sending students to China as part of their study abroad program for a number of years, but this Winter Session marks the first time that a CSI professor has traveled to China to teach one of her courses in the program.

Nan Sussman, Associate Professor of Psychology at CSI, is teaching Psychology 217: Psychology and Chinese Culture at Shanghai University in China this January. Sussman, a two-time Fulbright award recipient will join CUNY students in the intensive four-week Winter Session to teach her course on Chinese culture, through a psychology researcher’s lens. According to her syllabus, “We will focus on the role of Chinese culture in shaping psychological concepts, thinking, and behavior and on psychological research generated by investigators in China and other East Asian countries.”

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Sussman has written a book on a related subject, entitled, Return Migration and Identity: A Global Phenomenon, a Hong Kong Case. She has been presenting the book throughout Hong Kong and China since November and is internationally recognized for her research on the psychological consequences of Chinese return migration. Sussman was awarded a Fulbright grant in 2004 to interview 50 “re-emigrants,” people who moved from Hong Kong to Western countries and then returned, in order to gauge how they coped with the transition. “As a research psychologist, I am interested in understanding the process of cultural transitions and developing solutions to minimizing the distress associated with these transitions,” said Sussman. “I am particularly interested in reverse culture shock, the process of returning to your home country, either by sojourners (teachers, students, business personnel, missionaries, etc) or immigrants, and the subsequent changes in identity.”

Dr. Nan Sussman, greeting people and signing books at the Hong Kong University book launch.

There are 26 CUNY students attending this Winter Session in Shanghai, taking courses like Intensive Beginning Chinese, Business in Contemporary China, and the aforementioned Psychology and Chinese Culture that is new to the Winter Session curriculum. The course will introduce students to Chinese history and compare Chinese psychology to its Western counterparts. Field trips to area schools and a traditional Chinese medicine hospital have been arranged in order for the CUNY students to experience the day-to-day lives of Chinese people firsthand.  Psychology 217 will also introduce students to the concept of the Chinese Diaspora and “return migration.” The course has attracted both students of Chinese ancestry and non-Chinese students interested in learning more about how Chinese culture influences the individual. “In learning the Chinese perspective, they will learn about their own culture,” said Russell Davis, Study Abroad Advisor and CUNY China Programs Coordinator. All of the classes taught in the China Study Abroad Program feature multiple field trips and guest lectures by Shanghai experts that will assist the students in gaining more perspective into the disciplines.

The China program also includes summer and full semester sessions as well as year-long programs. In addition, the Center for International Service offers programs in cooperation with partner institutions in China where “they send students to us to learn English and American culture, especially pertaining to the five boroughs,” said Ann Helm, Director of the Center for International Service. CSI has offered a professional development program in the summer in which CSI and CUNY faculty and staff participated in a Educators Study Tour to partner schools to learn about issues in higher education in China. “CSI is unique because of its diversity,” said Helm, addressing CSI’s ability to maintain relationships with any number of other universities around the world. The Center for International Service is unique because it makes CSI one of the few colleges in the country that has a built-in support structure for handling overseas development. “If there is an opportunity we can respond quickly.”

Through the Center for International Service, CSI can support many international relationships that benefit all of CUNY’s students both at home and abroad. Students at CSI get the opportunity to meet other students and faculty from different walks of life, enabling them to view their own communities with an international understanding. The students who choose to study abroad can do so in over 30 countries in low-cost, high-quality programs where they earn academic credit and have many scholarship opportunities. As Davis puts it, “all of our students come back tuned into the world—they are all connected.”

U.S. International Trade Commission Invites CSI Professor for Talk on Counterfeit Goods

Professor Alan Zimmerman and Professor Peggy Chaudhry

CSI Professor Alan Zimmerman was invited to speak before the United States International Trade Commission (USITC) last month to discuss the economic impact of the sale of counterfeit goods in China.

In his talk entitled “Protecting International Property Rights: The Special Case of China,”  Zimmerman focused on how the counterfeit market in China adversely affects sales of genuine goods in the U.S. The talk, based on the book, The Economics of Counterfeit Trade: Governments, Consumers, Pirates, and Intellectual Property Rights, co-authored by Zimmerman and Prof. Peggy Chaudhry, pinpointed specific issues of counterfeit trade, namely the level of consumer complicity and extent of the host country’s enforcement of intellectual property (IP) laws.

The size of the Chinese counterfeit market is vast, 93% of the potential market for the film industry is lost to counterfeiting as well as 25% of health care goods.  The most damage is done through business software piracy, which accounts for nearly 100% of software used in China. “The Chinese government recognizes this issue as a major problem and they are working hard to improve the situation,” says Zimmerman who is currently visiting China to continue his research.

At the USITC, Zimmerman primarily focused on his findings from a researcher’s lens, but he also defined certain situations in China that helped breed the sale and consumption of counterfeit goods, such as the lack of enforcement of IP laws. Zimmerman also touched on Chinese history and philosophy in pinpointing the obstacles that legitimate brand holders must overcome, outlining one major historical pillar of Chinese belief, “individual inventions draw on past knowledge, which belongs to all citizens.”

The USITC is an independent, quasi-judicial Federal agency with broad investigative responsibilities on matters of trade. The agency investigates the effects of dumped and subsidized imports on domestic industries and conducts global safeguard investigations.  The Commission also serves as a Federal resource where trade data and other trade policy-related information are gathered and analyzed. The information and analysis are provided to the President, the Office of the United States Trade Representative (USTR), and Congress to facilitate the development of sound and informed U.S. trade policy.

Alan Zimmerman is a Professor of Business and Area Coordinator for the International Business program at CSI. He teaches Global Strategy and Business-to-Business Marketing for the Master’s program.  He has co-authored three books on international business.