Richmond County Savings Foundation Provides Support for Marchi Visiting Scholar and SI Leadership Institute

Cesar Claro, Executive Director of the Richmond County Savings Foundation (RCSF), presented a check for $51,000 to College of Staten Island President Tomá¡s Morales today, providing $50,000 to fund a new Senator John J. Marchi Visiting Scholar in Public Affairs position and for $1,000 of continued funding for the Staten Island Leadership Institute.

The Visiting Scholar position recognizes Senator Marchi as a tireless advocate for Staten Island for nearly six decades and a leader in the development of legislation to strengthen education at all levels, as well as his unwavering commitment to the College of Staten Island. The Staten Island Leadership Institute provides a forum where emerging community and business leaders come together in an environment that fosters growth and dialogue on community issues.

Commenting on the Marchi Visiting Scholar position, Claro says, “My board is proud and honored to support this project and to recognize Senator Marchi’s contribution to the people of Staten Island.” Claro added that his foundation made the grant in honor of Senator Marchi’s late brother, Nando, who was a member of the RCSF board.

President Morales states that the grants will “significantly benefit the College and the residents of Staten Island by greatly enhancing the level of scholarship and leadership in the Borough.”

CSI Hosts an Evening of Sri Lankan Music

Celebrated Sri Lankan musicians Rookantha Goonatillake and Chandralekha Perera host an evening of music and dance from the Sri Lankan diaspora performed in Sinhalese and English at the College of Staten Island’s Center for the Arts on Saturday, December 8 at 8:00pm. Hear hits from TV, film, and their many recordings, as well as new songs. Enjoy dance with Shiromi’s Dance Troupe and Roshan & Rhythm Lanka.

Goonatillake’s band, RU & CRU, features musicians Milan Rodrigo, guitar; Sumith Tissera, guitar; Suresh Robert, bass; Cisil Fernando, trumpet, saxophone; Akila Dharmasena, drums; and NYC musician, Newman Taylor Baker, drum set/percussion. Mahinda Bandara is expected to perform as a guest artist, but could not be confirmed at press time.

Goonatillake has sold thousands of albums in Sri Lanka and has a following around the world. Perera is a renowned television and film star.

Tickets for Ru Sanda Rae at the Center for the Arts, College of Staten Island, are $25 and can be purchased through the CFA Box Office, 718.982.ARTS (2787) or online at www.cfashows.com.

Directions to the Center for the Arts:
By Car: The Center for the Arts is located within a few minutes’ drive from the Verrazano, Goethals, and Bayonne Bridges. Take I-278 (the Staten Island Expressway) and exit at Victory Boulevard, proceed to campus parking lots 1 and 2. Parking is free.

By Mass Transit: The Center for the Arts is served by the S62, S61, S93, and S53 buses, which are coordinated with the Staten Island Ferry schedule.

Spotlighting Hellenic Culture on Staten Island

Academy Award and Golden Globe winner Olympia Dukakis will perform at the College of Staten Island (CSI) on December 1 as part of a dinner theater fundraiser by The Friends of CSI in association with the CSI Parthenon Project.

Dukakis will share the Center for the Arts Williamson Theatre stage with her actor husband Louis Zorich in a brilliant reading of the eloquent and moving play, I take your hand in mine, by Carol Rocamora, based on the love letters of Russian playwright Anton Chekhov and his famous actress wife Olga Knipper.

The evening begins at 6:00pm with dinner, and the performance is followed by dessert and conversation with the actors. Event chairs are Nancy and Christopher Benbow, and Christine and Peter Cea. Tickets cost $100, and can be purchased by calling the CSI Advancement office at 718.982.2365.

“This event continues to engage the Friends as “˜ambassadors’ of CSI,” said Dr. Christine Cea, president of the Friends. “Our mission has always been to explore ways to acquaint our Staten Island community with the riches that CSI holds, and this is a perfect opportunity to do so. This event will showcase world-class talent, infuse money to the Parthenon Project, and ultimately create an enduring legacy of Hellenic culture on the Staten Island.’

The Parthenon Project includes the painstaking restoration of 12 plaster casts of the Parthenon’s western frieze and installation in the Atrium of the college’s Center for the Arts.

“One of the cornerstones of the Friends is their commitment to public higher education, and the college is a better place today because of their four decades of dedication,” said Dr. Tomá¡s D. Morales, president of CSI. “Their support of the curatorial aspects of the CSI Parthenon Project through this dinner theater event underscores their commitment to the community and in enhancing the life-enriching educational and cultural resources that CSI has to offer.”

The Friends are not the only people in support of the Parthenon Project. The Stavros Niarchos Foundation recently committed $65,000 to complete the restoration of the casts, which were made in Boston by the P.P. Caproni & Brother Company some time between 1892 and 1927, from molds that the British Museum of London took directly from the Parthenon in Athens in the 1820s. The Niarchos grant also funds permanent installation of the casts in the Atrium of CSI’s Center for the Arts.

Upon completion of the project, CSI will offer tours to school groups and to the public, providing a rare glimpse into the history of Hellenic culture, and will create a 100-foot photo atlas of the Parthenon Frieze that will include descriptive plaques and other educational materials so that the atlas can be a more effective learning tool.

The exhibit will also allow CSI to develop new course offerings, expand faculty research, and increase the CSI Library collection as it relates to Greek culture and history, added Dr. Morales.

“This project allows CSI to enhance the study of ancient Greece and classical antiquity for CSI students and school groups, as well as provide the ability to expose campus visitors to the history of Hellenic culture,” said Bob Huber, interim vice president for college advancement. “The generous grant from the prestigious Stavros Niarchos Foundation represents a new source of international support to our college, and will present Staten Islanders with a first-class artistic and educational resource.”

Other notable contributors to the Parthenon Project include the Honorable Matthew Mirones, the New York State Department of Education, the AHEPA Educational Foundation, the Staten Island AHEPA Chapter, Professor Stamos Zades, and Ms. Mary Chrampanis, Huber noted, adding that “this project is an excellent example of CSI and the community working together to benefit the Island.”

The Friends of CSI dinner theater event is offered as part of Island Culture: Near and Far, the 2007-2008 season at the Center for the Arts.

PHOTO AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST:

Conservator Karen J. Fix of Conservation Artists restores one of the CSI’s 12 casts of the Parthenon Frieze. Photo by Veronica Carle.

(Additional photos also available.)

BACKGROUND ON THE PARTHENON FRIEZE PROJECT:

Sandra Gambetti, Assistant Professor of History at CSI, has been very busy lately, not only trying to gain insight into the origins of 12 plaster casts of the Parthenon’s western frieze that now belong to the College, but, along with Craig Manister from the Department of Performing and Creative Arts, is also overseeing their restoration so that students, staff, and visitors to CSI may enjoy them, and learn from them.

Thus far, one cast has been completely restored, and another four are undergoing renovation. Gambetti reports that the casts were made in Boston by the P.P. Caproni & Brother company some time between 1892 and 1927. Although she states that it is difficult to trace the exact origins of the casts, Gambetti theorizes that they might be the result of a combination of two other molds””those recreated from original molds commissioned by Lord Elgin in 1802, which were stored at the British Museum, and another set, the so-called Merlin molds, which were created in 1872. The resulting casts corrected flaws and faults to portray a more accurate depiction of the original frieze.

Gambetti is also investigating how the Caproni factory gained access to the molds so that it could produce the casts, but presently, she notes that she
can only speculate on this because the factory’s archives were destroyed many
years ago. According to Gambetti, the British Museum’s formatore (the person
responsible for the Museum’s molds), Domenico Brucciani, whom the Museum
allowed to hold most of its molds in his place of residence, eventually started his own company. After his death in 1880, his company continued, and it is possible that the founder of the Caproni factory gained access to them as he traveled throughout Europe in search of molds for his company.

As for the more recent history of the casts, Gambetti discovered that they originally belonged to the Staten Island Academy, acquired through a private donation. The Academy displayed the casts in the main hall of the institution’s library. In the early 1970s, the Academy moved from its original location in St. George, leaving the casts in an abandoned building that was eventually scheduled for demolition. Pat Passlof and Arthur Levine, professors at (what was then) Richmond College, which was located across the street from the Academy, came to the casts’ rescue, storing them in an unused room until 1994, when they moved to the present-day CSI campus, and the Atrium of the Center for the Arts (CFA).

CSI Hosts Olympia Dukakis and Louis Zorich in a Staged Reading of "I take your hand in mine"

The College of Staten Island hosts a staged reading of I take your hand in mine, a play based on the love letters of Russian playwright Anton Chekhov and his actress-wife Olga Knipper, starring Olympia Dukakis and Louis Zorich, in the Center for the Arts Williamson Theatre on Saturday, December 1 at 8:00pm. A Q&A with the actors follows the performance.

I take your hand in mine is an intimate glimpse into the lives of two lovers, Chekhov and Knipper. We are voyeurs to the tenderness and longing in their too brief marriage, which struggles against their separation, through playwright Carol Rocamora’s translation and dramatization of the more than 400 love letters they shared.

Academy Award winner Olympia Dukakis and her husband Louis Zorich star in this unique vehicle, well suited to the talents of these successful artists and devotees of Chekhov. They bring to life the passion that bound these two great superstars at the dawning of the 20th century”“he an internationally famous playwright, and she the renowned leading lady of the acclaimed Moscow Art Theatre, where she created many of the starring female roles in his plays.

It was Olympia Dukakis who realized the potential in their story, and urged Ms. Rocamora to create this unique theatrical vehicle for herself and Zorich. Prepared by their lifelong relationship with Chekhov’s plays, having performed virtually all of them at the Williamstown Theatre Festival, and directed some of them as well, these two performers were ready to explore the real people behind their inspiration.

Chekhov (1860-1904) already had an advanced case of tuberculosis when he met Knipper (1868-1959) in the fall of 1898. She was rehearsing the role of Arkadina in Chekhov’s revised version of The Seagull for the newly formed Moscow Art Theatre, under the celebrated director Constantin Stanislavski. The production’s success”“and her personal triumph in it (“Miss Knipper shines in the superb ensemble!”)”“ meant that she spent the theater seasons in Moscow while he, under doctor’s orders, spent the long Russian winters in the warmer climate of Yalta. These separations, which continued after their marriage in 1901, made letters their primary form of communication for months at a time. The letters, which Anton signed “I take your hand in mine,” tell of his love and passion for Olga, and of the closeness and tragedies in their marriage”“as when Olga suffers a miscarriage and comes close to death in Moscow.

The play sheds light on the artistic and emotional life of Russia’s greatest playwright as he crafted his two last great plays, The Three Sisters and The Cherry Orchard, while succumbing to his fatal tuberculosis. “I’m writing a play [The Three Sisters]”“well, not exactly a play, a sort of hodgepodge. There are so many characters I get confused.” She writes to him for guidance and direction of the plays, while he rails that “I cannot let Stanislavski ruin this play!”¦The doctors be damned. I’m coming to Moscow for rehearsals”¦”

They reveal Olga’s endearing love and devotion as she takes Anton on his final journey to a German health resort where he dies with her beside him. “Dearest darling, my sweet love, let me speak some words of tenderness, let me stroke your soft, silky hair and look into your dear, shining, loving eyes. If only I knew whether you felt you were going to die. I think you did, vaguely perhaps, but you did “¦ Dearest, dearest one, where are you now ?”

I take your hand in mine is the passionate and enduring record of their love affair.

Tickets for I take your hand in mine at the Center for the Arts, College of Staten Island, are $40, $45, and $50 and can be purchased through the CFA Box Office, 718.982.ARTS (2787) or online at www.CFAshows.com

This evening is presented in association with the CSI Parthenon Project, which aims to restore and exhibit a collection of rare casts of the Parthenon Frieze that CSI has acquired.

The CSI Center for the Arts 2007-2008 season is supported in part with funds from the Richmond County Savings Foundation; a gift by the Carnegie Corporation (made possible by an anonymous donor); the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs; the Office of the Borough President, Hon. James P. Molinaro; the National Dance Project of the New England Foundation for the Arts; the Staten Island Rotary Foundation; the College of Staten Island; and by our many business and individual patrons.

Directions to the Center for the Arts:

By Car: The Center for the Arts is located within a few minutes’ drive from the Verrazano, Goethals, and Bayonne Bridges. Take I-278 (the Staten Island Expressway and exit at Victory Boulevard, proceed to campus parking lots 1 and 2. Parking is free.

By Mass Transit: The Center for the Arts is served by the S62, S61, S93, and S53 buses, which are coordinated with the Staten Island Ferry schedule.

CSI Diversity Officer Receives Award for Documentary

Kevin Antoine, chief diversity officer at The City University of New York’s College of Staten Island, received the New York International Independent Film & Video Festival’s Best Political Documentary award for his film The Candidate, which chronicled his candidacy for the U.S. House of Representatives in 1996.

With his initial foray into elective politics, Antoine became the first African American to win a major political party’s nomination in Mississippi’s majority-White Fourth Congressional District, upsetting the Mississippi political establishment. The film follows the strategic campaign of this political novice’s unexpected win of the Democratic nomination while running against 11-year Jackson city council member Margaret Barrett.

Well-spoken, educated, and charismatic, Antoine says “I ran on a platform of being fiscally conservative and socially progressive, billing myself as part of a ‘new generation’ of legislators.”

In his letter of congratulations, the New York International Independent Film & Video Festival’s Renata Lorenc noted, “we are very proud of your filmmaking achievements.”

Antoine walked the red carpet last Friday night into The China Club in New York City to receive his award at a star-studded extravaganza. He left later that night, a star in his own right. More information about the film and the award-winning filmmaker can be found online at www.KevinAntoine.com

Kevin Antoine is active in New York City community affairs and serves on the Advisory Board of the New York Urban League, Staten Island Branch. He earned his Doctor of Law degree from the College of William & Mary School of Law, and is a former Harvard University Administrative Fellow. He also served as an officer in the U.S. Air Force.

CSI Center for the Arts Hosts the Best of the New York International Children's Film Festival

The New York International Children’s Film Festival (NYICFF), one of the largest film festivals for children and teens in North America, brings its first “Best of” tour to the Center for the Arts’ CFA Kids series on Sunday, October 21, 2007, from noon-6:30pm. NYICFF Directors Emily Shapiro and Eric Beckman selected from an archive of nearly 1,000 films, 12 award-winning features and shorts in animation, live action, and experimental genres from eight countries. Children’s activities and refreshments are planned for the CFA Atrium. Tickets are $10 (single film program); $15 (all-day pass/unlimited viewing) and can be purchased in person, by phone, by mail, and online through the CFA Box Office, 2800 Victory Boulevard, 1P-113, Staten Island. Hours: Monday-Friday, 9:00am to 4:00pm; Saturday, noon to 3:00pm; 718.982.ARTS (2787), www.cfashows.com.

PROGRAM 1: WILLIAMSON THEATRE
SCREENINGS: NOON AND 1:30PM
Help, I’m a Fish! (Animation, Hener/Fjeldmark, Denmark, 2000, 72 minutes)
From the Academy Award-nominated director of When Life Departs, the undersea adventure of three kids who stumble upon the hidden cave-laboratory of mad professor MacKrill and drink a potion that transforms them into sea creatures. It features the voices of Monty Python’s Terry Jones and Alan Rickman (Die Hard, Prince of Thieves). Proceeded by Catch of the Day (Animation, John Dilworth, U.S., 2000, 9 minutes). Recommended for ages 4-10.

PROGRAM 2: RECITAL HALL
SCREENINGS: 3:00 AND 4:45PM
Hammer Boy (Animation, Tae Dun An, South Korea, 2003, 73 minutes, in English)
In the year 2112, on a future Earth transformed by cataclysmic earthquakes and tidal waves, the continents are sunk under the sea and remnants of land barely sustain scattered civilizations. Here a small, close-knit community provides a home for a rambunctious boy named Mangchi, who yearns for the world beyond his isolated enclave. Proceeded by Field Guide to Snapping (Animation, Nihhil Adnani, Canada, 2003, 3 minutes). Recommended for ages 6-12.

PROGRAM 3: LECTURE HALL
SCREENINGS: NOON AND 1:30PM
A Program of Shorts (65 minutes)
The Freak (Animation, Aristomenis Tsirbas, U.S., 2002, 7 minutes), Hello (Animation, Jonathan Nix, Australia, 2003, 6.5 minutes), My Head (Experimental, Knut Petter Ryan, Norway, 2004, 4 minutes), Guide Dog (Animation, Bill Plympton, U.S., 2006, 6 minutes), One Day a Man Bought a House (Animation, Pjotr Sapegin, U.S.,1998, 7 minutes), Earthquake (Animation, James Brett, UK, 2002, 2 minutes), Flatlife (Animation, Jonas Geirnaert, Belgium, 2004, 11 minutes), The Runaway (Live Action, Ulrike Grote, Germany, 2004, 23 minutes). Recommended for ages 8 to 14.

The NYICFF was founded in 1997 to promote intelligent, passionate, and provocative cinematic works for ages three through 18 and to help define a more compelling film for kids. Each spring, the NYICFF presents a highly selective slate of the best animation, live action, documentary, and experimental film from around the world. This year, the NYICFF launches its first “Best of” tour.

This CFA Kids event is part of the 2007-2008 CFA season: Island Culture: Near and Far. The CFA is easily reached by car from I-278; campus parking lots 1 and 2 are recommended. By MTA, take the S62, 61, 93, 53, and the Staten Island Ferry with connections to the bus.

CFA Kids is supported by New York State Senator Andrew J. Lanza of the 24th Senate District serving Staten Island. The CSI Center for the Arts 2007-2008 season is additionally supported, in part, with funds from the Richmond County Savings Foundation; a gift by the Carnegie Corporation (made possible by an anonymous donor); the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs; the Office of the Borough President, Hon. James P. Molinaro; the National Dance Project of the New England Foundation for the Arts; Time Warner Cable; the Staten Island Rotary Foundation; the College of Staten Island; and by our many business and individual patrons.

Island Culture: Near and Far, CSI Center for the Arts 2007-2008 Season
continues with:

Saturday, October 27, 8:00pm Three Sisters from Queens

Sunday, October 28, 3:00pm Cenicienta/Cinderella

Saturday, November 17, 8:00pm I-Land

Saturday, December 1, 8:00pm I take your hand in mine

Saturday, December 8, 8:00pm Ru Sanda Rae (Beauty,
Moon, Night)

Sunday, February 3, noon-6:30pm Best of the New York
International Children’s
Film Festival

Saturday, February 9, 8:00pm Staten Island: Alive in
Wonderland

Saturday, February 23, 8:00pm Two Accordions with
Attitude

Saturday, March 1, 8:00pm Eileen Ivers & Immigrant
Soul

Sunday, March 9, 3:00pm Drum Folk

Saturday, March 15, 8:00pm An Evening of Duets

Friday, March 29, 8:00pm AXIS Dance Company

Sunday, April 6, 3:00pm This American Life

Saturday, April 12, 8:00pm Vernon Reid

Saturday, April 19, 8:00pm Colin Hay

Saturday, May 3, 3:00pm Emilio and the Enchanted
Cow

Saturday, May 17, 3:00pm The Musical Adventures of
Flat Stanley

CSI Center for the Arts: 718-982-ARTS or www.cfashows.com

Murdered 1970s Anti-Mafia Youth Activist Celebrated in Film, Song, and Conversation

Filmmaker Anthony Fragola premieres Un bellisimo ricordo (A Beautiful Memory): A Mother and Her Sons against the Mafia, his new documentary on the life and death of Giuseppe “Peppino” Impastato, an anti-Mafia youth activist murdered by the Mafia in 1978, on Saturday, October 6 at 7:30pm, in the Williamson Theatre as part of the 2007-2008 season, Island Culture: Near and Far, presented by the Center for the Arts at the College of Staten Island.

The evening also features a concert by Michela Musolino, a musician who specializes in Musica Popolare di Sicilia, and a Q&A hosted by Giancarlo Lombardi, Associate Professor of Italian and Comparative Literature at the College of Staten Island and The Graduate Center/CUNY with Fragola, Musolino, and Roberto Dainotto, author of The Importance of Being Sicilian and ex-member of the association “Fausto e Iaio,” which collaborated on anti-Mafia activities with the Centro Peppino Impastato. All of the guest artists have family roots in Sicily.

Tickets are $25 and can be purchased in person, by phone, by mail, and online through the CFA Box Office, 2800 Victory Boulevard, 1P-113, Staten Island. Hours: Monday—Friday, 9:00am to 4:00pm; Saturday, noon to 3:00pm. 718-982-ARTS (2787), www.cfashows.com.

“This is a very important event because it celebrates unsung heroes of contemporary Italy,” states Lombardi. “Fragola’s film will move viewers. His program with Musolino and Dainotto will grant further depth to the discussion of such timely issues.”

Fragola’s Un bellisimo ricordo features inspiring conversations and guided tours of the landscape of Peppino’s life by his surviving younger brother, Giovanni Impastato, as well as the last recorded interviews of their passionate, anti-Mafia mother, the late Felicia Bartolotta Impastato (1916-2004), the first woman to speak out openly against the Mafia and file a civil suit to bring justice for her son. Michela Musolino will be joined Kato Hideki in performance of a mix of traditional and contemporary Sicilian folk songs about tamuri and giustizia (love and justice). One piece, “Ciuri di Campu,” is a contemporary Sicilian folk song based on a poem written by Peppino Impastato. The Q&A brings together a distinguished group of artists and scholars of Sicilian culture.

This evening is part of the 2007-2008 CFA season: Island Culture: Near and Far. The CFA is easily reached by car from I-278; campus parking lots 1 and 2 are recommended. By MTA, take the S62, 61, 93, 53, and the Staten Island Ferry with connections to the bus.

The CSI Center for the Arts 2007-2008 season is supported, in part, with funds from the Richmond County Savings Foundation; a gift by the Carnegie Corporation (made possible by an anonymous donor); the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs; the Office of the Borough President, Hon. James P. Molinaro; Dr. Michael Shugrue; the National Dance Project of the New England Foundation for the Arts; Time Warner Cable; the Staten Island Rotary Foundation; the College of Staten Island; and by our many business and individual patrons.

Island Culture: Near and Far, CSI Center for the Arts 2007-2008 Season
continues with:

Saturday, October 13, 8:00pm Pete Michaels’ New
Vaudeville

Monday, October 14, 7:30pm New York Philharmonic
Brass Ensemble

Sunday, October 21, noon-6:30pm Best of the New York
International Children’s
Film Festival

Saturday, October 27, 8:00pm Three Sisters from Queens

Sunday, October 28, 3:00pm Cenicienta/Cinderella

Saturday, November 17, 8:00pm I-Land

Saturday, December 1, 8:00pm I take your hand in mine

Saturday, December 8, 8:00pm Ru Sanda Rae (Beauty,
Moon, Night)

Sunday, February 3, noon-6:30pm Best of the New York
International Children’s
Film Festival

Saturday, February 9, 8:00pm Staten Island: Alive in
Wonderland

Saturday, February 23, 8:00pm Two Accordions with
Attitude

Saturday, March 1, 8:00pm Eileen Ivers & Immigrant
Soul

Sunday, March 9, 3:00pm Drum Folk

Saturday, March 15, 8:00pm An Evening of Duets

Friday, March 29, 8:00pm AXIS Dance Company

Sunday, April 6, 3:00pm This American Life

Saturday, April 12, 8:00pm Vernon Reid

Saturday, April 19, 8:00pm Colin Hay

Saturday, May 3, 3:00pm Emilio and the Enchanted
Cow

Saturday, May 17, 3:00pm The Musical Adventures of
Flat Stanley

CSI Center for the Arts: 718-982-ARTS or www.cfashows.com

The Tabu Project: A Silent Film Masterpiece with Live Music

The Tabu Project is a one-day residency that includes an afternoon public master class and an evening film screening of Tabu, the last film made by German émigré director F. W. Murnau and documentarian Robert Flaherty, with live music featuring silent film musical artists Donald Sosin and Joanna Seaton on Wednesday, October 3, 2007, in the Williamson Theatre. This project is presented by the Center for the Arts (CFA) as part of its 2007-2008 season, Island Culture: Near and Far, with the Department of Media Culture and the Office of Student Life at the College of Staten Island (CSI).

“It is exciting to have two such world-renowned silent film musicians in their debut performance of original music for one the great late silent films at the CFA,” explains Dr. Matthew Solomon, silent film scholar and CSI Media Culture faculty member. “With live musical accompaniment, silent films made more than 75 years ago become totally vibrant, ever-changing works of art. Seeing a silent film while listening to a superb accompanist like Donald Sosin performing live is a unique experience — it is entirely different from seeing the same film with a pre-recorded soundtrack.”

The residency begins midday with a free, public master class, “Creating Music for the Silent Film,” with Donald Sosin, Joanna Seaton, and Dr. Matthew Solomon, noon-2:15pm, in the Williamson Theatre. It continues at 7:30pm, in the Williamson Theatre, with The Tabu Project, an evening of silent film with live music. Hosted by Professor Solomon, the program opens with a concert of early 1900s “going to pictures” music by Sosin, (keyboards) and Joanna Seaton (voice). It is followed by the screening of Tabu, accompanied by Donald Sosin who debuts his new score created for the CFA screening of this film. This performance marks Sosin’s first performance of music for Tabu.

Admission is $20 for the evening film screening and concert. Tickets for the screening can be made in person, by email, by phone, or by mail through the CFA Box Office, 2800 Victory Boulevard, 1P-113, Staten Island. Hours: Monday”“Friday, 9:00am to 4:00pm; Saturday, noon to 3:00pm. 718-982-ARTS (2787), www.cfashows.com. The master class is offered free to the general public on a first-come, first-served basis. The CFA is easily reached by car from I-278. Use campus parking lots 1 and 2. By MTA, take the S62, 61, 93, 53, and the Staten Island Ferry.

Tabu tells the story of two lovers in the South Seas who must escape their village when the girl is chosen as the holy maid to the gods. Tabu was the last film that celebrated German á©migrá© director F. W. Murnau (Nosferatu, The Last Laugh, Sunrise) made before he died. The film was shot on location in the South Seas in collaboration with the equally celebrated documentary film pioneer Robert Flaherty (Nanook of the North). The title of the film comes from the concept of tapu, a form of sacredness in many Polynesian cultures. It has been deemed “culturally significant” by the U.S. Library of Congress and was selected for preservation in the National Film Registry. It was released by Paramount in 1931 at the Central Park Theatre, New York, and re-released by Milestone Film & Video in 1991 through contractual arrangement with Murnau’s heirs.

Donald Sosin and Joanna Seaton are considered among the finest musicians creating music for silent films today. They have performed at major film festivals and performing arts centers all over the U.S., and have been teaching workshops in musical creativity for over 20 years. Dr. Matthew Solomon is an assistant professor in the Department of Media Culture at the College of Staten Island. Solomon is completing a book, Disappearing Tricks: Silent Cinema, Houdini, and the New Magic of the Twentieth Century, under contract with the University of Illinois Press.

The CSI Center for the Arts 2007-2008 season is supported, in part, with funds from the Richmond County Savings Foundation; a gift by the Carnegie Corporation (made possible by an anonymous donor); the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs; the Office of the Borough President, Hon. James P. Molinaro; Dr. Michael Shugrue; the National Dance Project of the New England Foundation for the Arts; Time Warner Cable; the Staten Island Rotary Foundation; the College of Staten Island; and by our many business and individual patrons.

Island Culture: Near and Far, CSI Center for the Arts 2007-2008 Season
continues with:

Saturday, October 6, 8:00pm A Beautiful Memory:
A Mother and Her
Sons against the Mafia

Saturday, October 13, 8:00pm Pete Michaels’ New
Vaudeville

Monday, October 14, 7:30pm New York Philharmonic
Brass Ensemble

Sunday, October 21, noon-6:30pm Best of the New York
International Children’s
Film Festival

Saturday, October 27, 8:00pm Three Sisters from Queens

Sunday, October 28, 3:00pm Cenicienta/Cinderella

Saturday, November 17, 8:00pm I-Land

Saturday, December 1, 8:00pm I take your hand in mine

Saturday, December 8, 8:00pm Ru Sanda Rae (Beauty,
Moon, Night)

Sunday, February 3, noon-6:30pm Best of the New York
International Children’s
Film Festival

Saturday, February 9, 8:00pm Staten Island: Alive in
Wonderland

Saturday, February 23, 8:00pm Two Accordions with
Attitude

Saturday, March 1, 8:00pm Eileen Ivers & Immigrant
Soul

Sunday, March 9, 3:00pm Drum Folk

Saturday, March 15, 8:00pm An Evening of Duets

Friday, March 29, 8:00pm AXIS Dance Company

Sunday, April 6, 3:00pm This American Life

Saturday, April 12, 8:00pm Vernon Reid

Saturday, April 19, 8:00pm Colin Hay

Saturday, May 3, 3:00pm Emilio and the Enchanted
Cow

Saturday, May 17, 3:00pm The Musical Adventures of
Flat Stanley

CSI Center for the Arts: 718-982-ARTS or www.cfashows.com