This Week in Core 100

The Core 100 program invites students and faculty from the College to join us for our weekly lecture series. Each week, all of the first-year students participate in lecture-discussions with about 400 of their classmates. We have space in the Center for the Arts (Building 1P) Williamson Theatre to accommodate individual guests and can have as many as two additional classes at each of the lectures. No permission is needed for classes to attend, but please notify Donna Scimeca at 718.982.3405 if you plan to bring a class.

The lectures are 50 minutes and are all in the Williamson Theatre. They meet on the following days/times: Wednesdays at 1:25pm and 3:35pm; on Thursdays at 8:00am, 10:10am, 4:40pm, and 6:30pm; and on Saturdays at 10:10am.

The Lecture Series Schedule for the Week of Monday, Sept. 5, 2016

Wednesday, Sept. 7:

-1:25pm: Core 100 Election Series: “Political Parties: Then and Now,” presented by Robert A. Grosso

This lecture will take a look at both the past and current platforms of the Republican and Democratic parties. The lecture will trace the origins of both parties back to the Federalists/Anti-Federalists debate between the founding fathers, and the numerous incarnations of the parties since the 19th Century to today, as well as the official party platforms.

Robert A. Grosso has been teaching Core 100 since 2015. He received his Bachelor’s degree in both History and Education at Iona College in New Rochelle, NY, and his Master’s degree in History at the College of Staten Island. A Staten Island native with a passion for teaching, Professor Grosso currently teaches at two colleges in the Tri-State Area, educating students in a diverse number of topics including Western Civilization, Civics, and Economics.

-3:35pm: Core 100 Election Series: “Defining the Democratic and Republican Parties,” presented by William Fallon

Against the backdrop of the Enlightenment and its philosophies, this lecture will explore the emergence, the evolution, and the ultimate importance of political parties here in the United States. Following a synopsis of the Enlightenment (which will include Thomas Paine and his influence on the founders to declare independence from England), this lecture will primarily focus on the aftermath of the Revolution and the political bodies that were born after independence was achieved. The lecture will provide insight and a basic timeline into this nation’s political parties–the prototypes, the initial factions/groups, and today’s two-party system. The topic and importance of the art of debate will echo throughout the lecture.

William Fallon is an Adjunct Professor in CSI’s CORE program. He is currently in his third semester with the Department. He received his MA in History from CSI in 2013. His focus is 20th-Century U.S. History and U.S. Foreign Policy.

Thursday,  Sept. 8:

-8:00am: Core 100 Election Series: “The Two Americas: Clinton v. Trump,” presented by Annette Marks-Ellis

Students will focus on two very different political personalities. They will discuss the billionaire business and real estate mogul and the experienced politician who has been a First Lady, United States Senator, and Secretary of State. As Clinton and Trump carve a path to the White House, they are creating historic milestones along the way. The discussion will uncover how the candidates are politically different and yet similar in their goal to become the 45th President of the United States. Based on each candidate’s position on a variety of topics and their plan to govern and unify the nation, students will attempt to visualize what a Clinton and Trump U.S. will look like.

Annette Marks-Ellis earned her undergraduate and graduate degrees at Columbia University. She has been at CSI and teaching Core 100 since 1999. She has published several articles on African American history, women’s issues, and Caribbean culture.

-10:10am: Core 100 Election Series: “The Electoral College/Presidential Election Process,” presented by Edward Manganel

After almost four years of media hype, political circus, and endless, often mind-numbing, debates, Americans will soon choose their next President. This lecture will examine the controversial Presidential electoral process; why the founding fathers created it, the potential problems inherent in the process, and the extent to which the system is democratic.

Edward Manganel received his BA from Marist College and his MA from the University of Colorado. He is the former Chair of the Social Studies Department and and AP U.S. History teacher at Monsignor Farrell HS. He has taught at CSI for 25 years and has been in the Core 100 program for ten years.

-4:40pm: Core 100 Election Series: “Globalization,” presented by David Loncle

This lecture will review how this topic is being described by each candidate and what the realities of globalization are economically, technologically, historically, and sociologically. The term is used ad hoc, often with at best a vague understanding of its meaning or history. What are the implications of trying to diminish globalization’s effects and proliferation and why is there such a push to return to nationalism? Effectively, this will review where the economic and political issues overlap.

David Loncle is an Adjunct Assistant Professor and has been with the Core program since Fall 2015. He comes to Core from the PCA Department where he has taught studio art since 2009.

-6:30pm: Core 100 Election Series: “The Electoral College,” presented by Anthony Casella

This lecture will provide an in-depth look at the institution that elects the President and Vice President of the United States every four years. We will examine how the citizens of the United States do not directly elect the President or the Vice President; instead, these voters directly elect designated intermediaries called “electors,” who almost always have pledged to vote for particular Presidential and Vice Presidential candidates (although unpledged electors are possible) and who are themselves selected according to the particular laws of each state. We will debate the relevance of the Electoral College in the U.S., looking at the pros and cons of this issue.

Anthony Casella has been a member of the CORE faculty since 2009. Professor Casella received both a Bachelor of Arts in History and a Master’s of Science in Education from St. John’s University. He also received a Master’s in Administration and Supervision from CSI/CUNY. Professor Casella currently is an Assistant Principal at PS 25R, South Richmond HS on Staten Island.

Saturday, Sept. 10:

-10:10am: Core 100 Election Series: “The Two Americas: Clinton v. Trump,” presented by Annette Marks-Ellis

Students will focus on two very different political personalities. They will discuss the billionaire business and real estate mogul and the experienced politician who has been a First Lady, United States Senator, and Secretary of State. As Clinton and Trump carve a path to the White House, they are creating historic milestones along the way. The discussion will uncover how the candidates are politically different and yet similar in their goal to become the 45th President of the United States. Based on each candidate’s position on a variety of topics and their plan to govern and unify the nation, students will attempt to visualize what a Clinton and Trump U.S. will look like.

Annette Marks-Ellis earned her undergraduate and graduate degrees at Columbia University. She has been at CSI and teaching Core 100 since 1999. She has published several articles on African American history, women’s issues, and Caribbean culture.