This Week in Core 100

The Core 100 program invites students and faculty from the College to join us for our weekly lecture series. Each week all of the first-year students participate in lecture-discussions in groups of about 400 of their classmates. We have space in the Center for the arts (Building 1P) Williamson Theatre to accommodate individual guests (no permission needed) and can have as many as two additional classes at each of the weekday lectures. (There is no space available in the Lecture Hall where Saturday sections meet for their group lecture.)  Permission is not needed for classes to attend, but please notify Donna Scimeca at 718.982.3405 if you plan to bring a class.

The weekday lectures are 50 minutes in length and are all in the Williamson Theatre. They meet on the following days/times: Wednesdays at 1:25pm and 3:35pm; on Thursdays at 9:05am, 11:15am, 5:30pm, and 6:30pm; and on Saturdays at 10:30am in the Center for the Arts Lecture Hall.

Schedule of Lectures for the week of Mar. 24, 2014

Wednesday, Mar. 26:  

1:25pm Lecture:  “Lynching in America,”presented by Deborah De Simone: This lecture explores why regular citizens of the United States felt justified in publicly torturing and then killing another human being. Through the use of photographs and newspaper articles from the late 1800s and early 1900s, the power of the noose as a symbol is explored as is the significance of the spectacle and bare-faceness of lynching.

Deborah De Simone earned her undergraduate degree at Brown University in American History and her graduate degree at Teachers College, Columbia University in History and Education. She was part of the faculty asked to design Core 100 and has taught in the program since it was first offered.

3:35pm Lecture: “The Civil War,” presented by Annette Marks-Ellis, is an overview of the Civil War and its legacy. Professor Marks-Ellis will show a 15-minute film that highlights the main events and participants of the four-year war between the Union and the Confederacy. After viewing, students will participate in a discussion focusing on the war’s legacy and the participants who were crucial to the Union’s victory.

Annette Marks-Ellis earned her undergraduate and graduate degrees at Columbia University. She has been at CSI and teaching Core 100 since 1999. She has published several articles on African American history, women’s issues, and Caribbean culture.

Thursday, March 27:
@ 9:05pm Lecture:  “The Civil War,” presented by Annette Marks-Ellis, is an overview of the Civil War and its legacy. Professor Marks-Ellis will show a 15-minute film that highlights the main events and participants of the four-year war between the Union and the Confederacy. After viewing, students will participate in a discussion focusing on the war’s legacy and the participants who were crucial to the Union’s victory.

Annette Marks-Ellis earned her undergraduate and graduate degrees at Columbia University. She has been at CSI and teaching Core 100 since 1999. She has published several articles on African American history, women’s issues, and Caribbean culture.

@ 11:15am Lecture: “The Civil War,” presented by Annette Marks-Ellis, is an overview of the Civil War and its legacy. Professor Marks-Ellis will show a 15-minute film that highlights the main events and participants of the four-year war between the Union and the Confederacy. After viewing, students will participate in a discussion focusing on the war’s legacy and the participants who were crucial to the Union’s victory.

Annette Marks-Ellis earned her undergraduate and graduate degrees at Columbia University. She has been at CSI and teaching Core 100 since 1999. She has published several articles on African American history, women’s issues, and Caribbean culture.

5:30pm and 6:30pm Lectures:  The Core Program is pleased to partner with the Office of Student Affairs to bring the Legal Aid Society to present “Know Your Rights: The Path of a Criminal Case.”  This important presentation and group discussion will augment the Core students’ recent study of the Constitution and Bill of Rights.

 

Leave a Reply