New Assistant VP for Institutional Advancement

Dr. Kenneth Boyden is the new Assistant Vice President for Institutional Advancement and External Affairs at the College of Staten Island.

Following a nationwide search and extensive campus participation, CSI Vice President for Institutional Advancement and External Affairs Barbara Eshoo has announced the appointment of Dr. Kenneth Boyden as the Assistant Vice President for Institutional Advancement and External Affairs at the College, effective Monday, Feb. 7, 2011.

Eshoo commented that “Dr. Boyden has a history of securing unprecedented support for his previous institutions, has expertise in the launch and management of highly successful capital campaigns, and has proven strategies for increasing philanthropic participation with alumni.”

Dr. Boyden previously served as Vice President for Institutional Advancement at Cabrini College and at Valley Forge Military Academy and College. He was Director of the Capital Campaign and Major Gifts at the University of the Sciences in Philadelphia, where he was later promoted to Vice President.

He holds a Doctor of Education in Higher Education Management degree from the University of Pennsylvania and a Juris Doctor from The Dickenson School of Law of Pennsylvania State University. His Bachelor’s degree, with honors, is from West Chester University. Dr. Boyden is also is a member of the American Bar Association and the Pennsylvania Bar Association.

“I commend the work of the search committee chaired by Professor David Bloomfield, Chair of the Education Department. The Committee’s diligence produced an outstanding pool of candidates, and its hard work ensured a successful outcome of this important search,” Eshoo said.

[video] Con Ed Supports Water Quality Workshops for HS Students

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The College of Staten Island has received a $25,000 grant from Con Edison to fund a program that will give underserved high school students the opportunity to gain first-hand experience in researching estuarine water quality.

As a result of this generous funding, CSI’s Center for Environmental Science will expand its public education program by giving more than 100 underserved high school and junior high school student’s opportunities to pursue various aspects of environmental work through hands-on estuarine water quality workshops.

Con Edison Director of Public Affairs Mark Irving with CSI President Dr. Tomás Morales after the check presentation at the CSI Celestial Ball

Marilyn Caselli, Con Edison’s Senior Vice President of Customer Operations, said: “As an energy delivery company for the New York area, Con Edison is committed to our community and the environment. This grant allows us to showcase that commitment through the excellent work of the College of Staten Island and its public education programs. I am pleased that Island high school students will have this engaging, hands-on opportunity that will promote their connection to civic purpose and create the next generation of stewards of our environment.” Ms. Caselli is a member of the CSI Foundation Board.

Lab and Fieldwork Promote Understanding

In the fall, high school students from area schools will visit a CSI laboratory where chemists from the Interstate Environmental Commission (IEC) will join CSI faculty to demonstrate analytical techniques and explain the importance of quality control measures. Students will gain a background on water quality and policy issues that influence estuarine health and obtain a better understanding of the primary environmental factors affecting the New York Harbor Estuary. The Center’s field staff will provide an overview of the parameters routinely performed in IEC water quality monitoring surveys and explain their relevancy and importance in assessments of the Harbor Estuary.

All Hands on Deck

The following spring, the field component will give students hands-on experience with water quality monitoring and pollution issues. They will be able to apply their knowledge and learn water quality monitoring techniques via demonstrations of sampling equipment/instruments on the dock and on the IEC’s ship, the R/V Natale Colosi. The Center’s captain and field staff will highlight some key information about the estuarine system. Onshore and onboard students will observe as IEC field staff employ a number of techniques to characterize water quality.  Subsequently, field exercises will allow students to take their own series of measurements and observations.  Students will record all data on student field sheets, allowing further analysis of observations when returning to the classroom. After completion of field and ship-based activities, students will go to the CSI Geographic Information System (GIS) laboratory where they will record their findings and results.

Barbara Eshoo, CSI Vice President for Institutional Advancement and External Relations said, “Thanks to Con Edison’s generosity and deep commitment to our College and community, CSI will be able to deliver a message to high school students and their educators that protecting, improving, and monitoring the estuary involves a comprehensive program of monitoring, sampling, analysis, and public education. Students will learn that they can help foster stewardship for the estuary by being a voice in their community via communicating and sharing what they learn about estuary issues in the workshops. Students will also gain an understanding of how estuary health impacts their lives, including food resources and recreational opportunities.”

In addition to its $25,000 in funding of this project, Con Edison has added $5,000 to its grant, which is earmarked for support of student scholarships at CSI.

Condolences on the Passing of Professor Stephen J. Stearns

It is with great sadness that I share with you the news regarding the death of our friend and colleague, Professor Stephen J. Stearns (1935-2011).   

Professor Stephen Stearns earned a PhD in History from the University of California, Berkeley. He also held a Bachelor of Arts degree from Harvard College and a Master’s Degree from Columbia University. Professor Stearns began his distinguished career at Richmond College in 1967, was tenured in 1970, and was promoted to the rank of Associate Professor in 1980.

Professor Stearns was a historian of early modern England, and his teaching included modern European and United States history. He was particularly interested in foreign policy because of its vital importance and relevance in today’s world.

During his time at CSI, Professor Stearns was a member of the PSC Campus Chapter Executive Committee, a delegate of the University Faculty Senate, and Deputy Chair of the History Department. He also served on the Teacher Education Advisory Committee (TEAC), The Verrazano School Advisory Committee, and the Science, Letters, and Society (SLS) Committee. 

In 2010, Professor Stearns was awarded the Dolphin Award for Outstanding Service and Contribution by a Member of the Full-time Faculty. He was deeply committed to the College of Staten Island in a profound way and worked long and hard toward its success. 

A memorial at the College will take place later in the spring, and the College will provide further information when it becomes available.

CUNY Trustees Expand Policy Prohibiting Use of Tobacco Making CUNY the Largest Smoke-Free Public University System In the United States

The Board of Trustees of The City University of New York has approved an expanded tobacco policy that will make CUNY the largest smoke-free public university system in the United States. The policy prohibits the use of tobacco on all grounds and facilities under CUNY’s jurisdiction–indoor and outdoor–as well as tobacco industry promotions and marketing on campus properties, and tobacco industry sponsorship of athletic events and athletes.

The Board’s resolution updates and supersedes the University’s previous policy, which prohibited smoking inside all facilities, including vehicles operated by the University. The revised tobacco policy must be implemented University-wide no later than Tuesday, Sept. 4, 2012.

The action was approved by the Board at its meeting on Monday, Jan. 24, 2011.

In a joint statement, Board Chairperson Benno Schmidt and Chancellor Goldstein said: “The harmful effects of tobacco use are well known. Tobacco is the leading cause of preventable death in the world today–and in New York City–and this action will further reduce exposure to tobacco and improve public health. As the nation’s largest urban public university, as a source of thousands of health-professions graduates, and as the home of the new CUNY School of Public Heath, CUNY has an opportunity–and a responsibility–to set appropriate standards as an example for universities seeking to protect the health of their students and employees.”

“I heartily congratulate the Board at CUNY for taking this groundbreaking step to protect the health of its students, faculty, and staff,” said Dr. Thomas Farley, New York City Health Commissioner. “I urge members of the CUNY community who smoke to use this as an opportunity to quit, as it is the single most important step you can take to improve your health. The Health Department looks forward to supporting CUNY as it implements this pioneering policy. Because of the Board’s actions, the CUNY community will be a healthier place to work and learn.”

Smoking-related deaths from cancer, heart and lung diseases, and other conditions account for more than 440,000 premature deaths each year, about one in five deaths in the United States. The U.S. Surgeon General has determined that exposure to secondhand smoke is dangerous to health and that reducing exposure will save lives and reduce health expenditures. Research further shows that any exposure to secondhand smoke–even outdoors–has harmful biological consequences. In addition, removing all smoking opportunity facilitates quitting, and research demonstrates that 70 percent of smokers wish to quit. Therefore, expanding the University’s policy will achieve a dual effect: motivating current smokers to cease smoking, and safeguarding CUNY students, faculty, and staff—more than 85 percent of whom are nonsmokers—from the toxic effects of secondhand smoke.

New York City has been a national leader in acting to reduce smoking. Through education, taxation, support of cessation programs, and expanding tobacco-free spaces, the city has helped to reduce smoking rates below national levels. All New York City public schools and medical facilities are already tobacco-free both inside and outside buildings.

The CUNY Board’s action comes at a time when an ever-increasing number of colleges and universities are instituting tobacco-free policies. As of Sunday, Jan. 2, 2011, at least 466 colleges and universities had enacted smoke-free or tobacco-free policies for their entire campuses, indoors and out.

At Chancellor Matthew Goldstein’s request, Executive Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs and University Provost Alexandra W. Logue led the University Advisory Committee on Tobacco Policy that researched and developed the recommendations that helped form the new policy. The Committee, which included faculty, staff, and students, conducted an extensive outreach program including the establishment of a Website to receive input from the University community.

“Part of our job is to promote the basic values of 21st-century higher education in the United States,” said Executive Vice Chancellor Logue. “These values include cultivating respect for others, emphasizing the importance of health and wellness, supporting environmental sustainability, and preparing students for professional success in workplaces that are, increasingly, tobacco-free.”

Under the leadership of University Director for Mental Health and Wellness Services Luis Manzo, CUNY will support the new policy by providing training, information, and other resources across the University system. Each college, as well as the Central Office, will be expected to submit college-specific implementation plans, allowing for the specific needs of each campus, for review and approval by the Chancellery by no later than Thursday, June 30, 2011.

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in New York City in 1847 as The Free Academy, the University’s 23 institutions include 11 senior colleges, six community colleges, the William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, the Graduate School and University Center, the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, the CUNY School of Law, the CUNY School of Professional Studies, and the CUNY School of Public Health. The University serves 262,000 academic credit students and 269,808 adult, continuing, and professional education students. College Now, the University’s academic enrichment program for 32,500 high school students, is offered at CUNY campuses and more than 300 high schools throughout the five boroughs of New York City. The University offers online baccalaureate degrees through the School of Professional Studies and an individualized baccalaureate through the CUNY Baccalaureate Degree. More than one million visitors and two million page views are served each month by the University’s Website.

REVISED TOBACCO POLICY

The largest urban university in the country, The City University of New York is committed to promoting the health and well being of its faculty, students and staff.

The harmful effects of tobacco use are well known, and have been confirmed increasingly by scientific research in the 16 years since the Board last considered the subject. Tobacco is the leading cause of preventable death in the world today—and in New York City.  Smoking-related deaths from cancer, heart and lung diseases, and other conditions account for more than 440,000 premature deaths each year, about one in five deaths in the United States. The U.S. Surgeon General has determined that exposure to secondhand smoke is dangerous to health and that reducing exposure will save lives and reduce health expenditures. Research further shows that any exposure to secondhand smoke—even outdoors—has harmful biological consequences. Further, removing all smoking opportunity facilitates quitting, and research demonstrates that 70 percent of smokers wish to quit. Expanding the University’s policy would therefore achieve a dual effect: motivating current smokers to cease smoking, and safeguarding CUNY students, faculty, and staff—more than 85 percent of whom are nonsmokers—from the toxic effects of secondhand smoke.

Therefore,  effective no later than September 4, 2012,  the following shall be prohibited at The City University of New York: (i) the use of tobacco on all grounds and facilities under CUNY jurisdiction, including indoor locations and outdoor locations such as playing fields; entrances and exits to buildings; and parking lots; (ii) tobacco industry promotions, advertising, marketing, and distribution of marketing materials on campus properties; and (iii) tobacco industry sponsorship of athletic events and athletes.

This policy promotes basic values of 21st-century American higher education:  cultivating respect for others, emphasizing the importance of health and wellness, supporting environmental sustainability, and preparing students for professional success in increasingly tobacco-free workplaces.

Slim down and win new borough-wide weight-loss contest; may make you $1,000 richer

Staten Island Slimdown
Staten Island Slimdown
Staten Island Slimdown

SILive.com – A borough-wide health initiative and weight-loss contest is picking up steam, even though it won’t officially launch for another two weeks.

Staten Island Slim Down, has attracted nearly 100 participants who heard about the free 10-week-program mostly by word-of-mouth.

The program mixes weekly exercise sessions at the College of Staten Island, online coaching, nutrition and cooking demonstrations, step-by-step lifestyle makeover plans for both men and women, and even a guided shopping tour of Shop & Stop to learn about making healthier grocery selections.

Contestants who submit before and after photos have a chance to win $1,000. The person with the most inspiring lifestyle transformation will be deemed the winner.

Those who don’t want to be photographed can opt out of the contest and join the program as a participant with access to all the program’s other offerings.

To register as a contestant or participant, log on to statenislandslimdown.com. A group category is also available.

Slim Down’s official kick-off is Jan. 29 at 3 p.m. at the Joan and Alan Bernikow Jewish Community Center in Sea View. At that time, participants can be weighed, have their blood pressure checked and body fat measured.

“We’re going to be encouraging Staten Island residents to start to embrace healthy lifestyle practices, such as consistent exercise, healthy eating, sleeping well and other aspects that directly impact health, wellness and weight management,” said Tony Books Avilez, a personal trainer who runs Staten Island Boot Camp and co-founded Slim Down.

The program is the brainchild of Avilez and Dr. Maureen Becker, director of clinical education for the College of Staten Island’s physical therapy doctoral program.

They met nearly 20 years ago as volunteers at a career day fair at an Island intermediate school. For the last few years, Avilez and Dr. Becker talked about collaborating on a health-related project.

In August they founded Staten Island Slim Down Inc., which is awaiting approval as a not-for-profit organization.

The program’s borough-wide reach through weekly meet-ups and online webinars and coaching gives participants support from multiple sources, explained Avilez.

“I work with people day-in and day-out who are looking to improve their fitness and well being,” he said. “I’ve found that the best way is when people have social support. Very often we try to do these things on our own and it becomes really challenging.”

In addition to sponsorships from CSI, the JCC, and Stop & Shop, the program has also garnered support from city Councilman James Oddo (R-Mid-Island/Brooklyn), the Staten Island Economic Development Corporation, Wagner College, Richmond University Medial Center, Family Health Foods, Get In Gear Cycling Studio and Alpha Omega Protection Services.

“Our hope is that this will become an annual thing that we can promote and do on Staten Island,” said Dr. Becker. “We’re going to do this and learn from this one what worked and what didn’t and each time make it better.

silive.com

© 2011 SILive.com. All rights reserved.  This story originally appeared in the Staten Island Advance on January 17, 2011 and is reprinted here with permission.

[video] Morris Honors Her Family’s Example, Accepts President’s Medal at Celestial Ball

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Dolores Morris, former Vice President of the HBO Family Channel, was a recipient of the President’s Medal, recently, at the CSI Celestial Ball, held at the Richmond County Country Club.

After Ms. Morris accepted her award “on behalf of my parents, grandparents, great grandparents, upon whose shoulders I stand, and have always stood,” she told the harrowing story of her grandfather, William Morris. He was forced from his home in North Carolina when he was 11 years old because he corrected a White shop owner who was cheating his family. He settled in Staten Island, where he founded a moving company that eventually became the largest moving company on the Eastern seaboard. Mr. Morris was also deeply committed to education and community service, and as a result IS 61 was named after him.

Ms. Morris said that his example and those of her family members are what led her to her own deep commitment to the Staten Island community.

View the CSI Today Photo Gallery and read the Celestial Ball article.

Make a Gift to the CSI Foundation.

CSI Shares, CSI Cares

Members of the College community are encouraged to give generously to The CUNY Campaign for Charitable Giving.

In these difficult economic times, contributions to The CUNY Campaign for Charitable Giving are needed now more than ever.

The CUNY Campaign provides desperately needed assistance for the homeless, home-bound senior citizens, teens who are struggling to complete high school, and others who are facing economic and social challenges.

Imagine what can be accomplished when we work together…

Transform the life a CSI student

CSI students’ lives are also positively affected by The CUNY Campaign through contributions that are designated for the CSI Foundation, a non-profit organization that provides crucial funding for scholarships. Just select code 1618 on your Pledge Form.

It’s easy, convenient, and a little goes a long way

Contributions can be automatically deducted from your salary and documented on your pay stub. What does your support provide?

  • $4 per biweekly pay period will buy health after-school snacks for ten children or bread for a year at a soup kitchen.
  • $6 per biweekly pay period will pay for three months of prescription medication for an uninsured working person or 21 meals per year for elderly people who cannot leave their homes.

Think about it….

  • Give up just one deluxe hamburger a month, your monthly payroll contribution of $4.00 = an annual gift of $48
  • If you give up one coffee and one donut a week, your monthly payroll contribution of $12.00 = an annual gift of $144
  • If you simply give up one soft drink per work day, your monthly payroll contribution of $30.00 = an annual gift of $360.

The CUNY Campaign has more than 1,200 charities participating. You may choose to support the CSI Foundation as one of the four charities of your choice available through CUNY Campaign payroll deduction. Other organizations and programs that touch our lives on a regular basis, such as daycare centers, senior citizens centers, and after-school activities, also benefit from the support of The CUNY Campaign.

Barbara Eshoo, CSI Vice President for Institutional Advancement and External Affairs, is the Campaign coordinator for the CSI campaign for this year.  All members of the College community are encouraged to review the CUNY Campaign brochure and are encouraged to make the most generous gift that they can afford.

If you have questions about the campaign or completing the form, please contact Susan Been in the Office of Institutional Advancement at 718.982.2365.  Completed Pledge Forms can be returned to Susan in Building 1A, Room 401, or you may call the Advancement Office and request to have your completed form picked up. Contributions are tax deductible in accordance with law.

Last year, members of the College community contributed $12,539 to The CUNY Campaign to bring some joy to the lives of those who are less fortunate.

Celestial Ball Raises $600K for Scholarships

CSI President Dr. Tomás Morales (fourth from right) poses with some of the student attendees at the Celestial Ball.

The Second Annual CSI Celestial Ball, held at the Richmond County Country Club on December 4, was another huge success, raising over $600,000 for student scholarships and support.

View the CSI Today Photo Gallery and make an online gift.

The event was attended by an enthusiastic group of over 220 people, including community leaders and business people, honorees and their family members and friends, and members of the CSI community, including CSI students. All attendees had the opportunity to celebrate and support the impact that a CSI education can make in the lives of our students, preparing them for success in an increasingly competitive job market, but also giving them the tools that they need to make the world a better place.

CSI President Dr. Tomás D. Morales presented the President’s Medal, with the assistance of Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs Dr. William Fritz, to the Ball honorees who included Salvatore Cassano, Fire Commissioner of the City of New York; Dolores N. Morris, former Vice President of HBO Family; and Dr. Fred Naider, Distinguished Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry at the College of Staten Island and a member of the Doctoral Faculty at The City University of New York.

During the program Joe Ricciutti ’94, Celestial Ball co-chair and President of the Staten Island Yankees, recognized the generosity of some of the major contributors to the College, including The Brooklyn Home For Aged Men, Con Edison, Northfield Bank Foundation, the Staten Island Foundation, National Grid, the Verizon Foundation, JPMorgan Chase, the Institute for Mexicans Abroad Scholarship, the Switzer Foundation, the Petrie Foundation, and Edgar and Lillian Rios.

Ten CSI students who have benefited from CSI scholarships were also in attendance to underscore the importance of these funds for so many who would not be able to get their educations without this crucial assistance. One such student, Megan Ernst, a freshman Business major, and a recipient of the CSI Foundation and John & Filomena Merlino scholarships, addressed the attendees, as did Student Government President Jolanta Smulski. 

The Celestial Ball was chaired by three volunteers, Dr. Christine Cea ’88, President of the Friends of CSI and Scientist at the Institute for Basic Research; Donna Fauci ’96, ’03, Member of the Board of Directors of the CSI Alumni Association, and Admissions Counselor and Program Coordinator with CSI’s Office of Recruitment and Admissions; and Joseph Ricciutti.

Last year’s Celestial Ball honorees, Dr. Gordon and Lorraine Di Paolo, Zane Tankel, and Robert Scamardella, served as Honorary Ball Committee members for this year’s Ball.